Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-5zjcf Total loading time: 0.696 Render date: 2022-08-15T20:04:26.153Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true
Accepted manuscript

Dietary inflammatory index, inflammation biomarkers and preeclampsia risk: A hospital-based case-control study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 May 2022

Yan-hua Liu*
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan, China
Lu Zheng
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No.601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong, Guangdong, China
Chen Cheng
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No.601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong, Guangdong, China
Shu-na Li
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No.601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong, Guangdong, China
Nitin Shivappa
Affiliation:
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA; Connecting Health Innovations LLC, Columbia, USA.
James R Hebert
Affiliation:
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA; Connecting Health Innovations LLC, Columbia, USA.
Wen-jun Fu
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan, China
Xian-lan Zhao
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan, China
Yuan Cao
Affiliation:
The Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan, China
Wei-feng Dou
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450000, Henan, China
Hua-nan Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450000, Henan, China
Dan-dan Duan
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Luoyang New Area People’s Hospital, Luoyang 471023, Henan, China
Quan-jun Lyu
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan, China Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450000, Henan, China
Fang-fang Zeng*
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No.601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong, Guangdong, China
*
#Correspondence: Fang-fang Zeng, Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China Tel.: +86 2085226335 Fax: +86 2085221343 E-mail: zengffjnu@126.com. Yan-hua Liu, Department of Nutrition, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University No. 1 Jianshe East Road, Zhengzhou 450052, China. Tel: 86 0371 66862963 Fax: 86 0371 66862963 E-mail: liuyanhua1015@163.com
#Correspondence: Fang-fang Zeng, Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China Tel.: +86 2085226335 Fax: +86 2085221343 E-mail: zengffjnu@126.com. Yan-hua Liu, Department of Nutrition, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University No. 1 Jianshe East Road, Zhengzhou 450052, China. Tel: 86 0371 66862963 Fax: 86 0371 66862963 E-mail: liuyanhua1015@163.com
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

This study evaluated the association between inflammatory diets as measured by the dietary inflammatory index (DII), and inflammation biomarkers, and the development of preeclampsia among the Chinese population. We followed the reporting guidelines of the STROBE statement for observational studies. A total of 466 preeclampsia cases aged over 18 years were recruited between March 2016 and June 2019, and 466 healthy controls were 1:1 ratio matched by age (± 3 years), week of gestation (± 1 week), and gestational diabetes mellitus. The energy-adjusted DII (E-DII) was computed based on dietary intake assessed using a 79-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Inflammatory biomarkers were analyzed by ELISA kits. The mean E-DII scores were -0.65 ± 1.58 for cases and -1.19 ± 1.47 for controls (P value <0.001). E-DII scores positively correlated with IFN-γ (rs = 0.194, P value = 0.001) and IL-4 (rs = 0.135, P value = 0.021). After multivariable adjustment, E-DII scores were positively related to preeclampsia risk (P trend <0.001). The highest tertile of E-DII was 2.18 times the lowest tertiles (95% CI = 1.52, 3.13). The odds of preeclampsia increased by 30% (95% CI= 18%, 43%, P value <0.001) for each E-DII score increase. The preeclampsia risk was positively associated with IL-2 (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.11), IL-4 (OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.54) and TGF-β (OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.06, 1.29). Therefore, proinflammatory diets, corresponding to higher IL-2, IL-4 and TGF-β levels, were associated with increased preeclampsia risk.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Authors 2022

Footnotes

*

These authors contributed equally to this work.

You have Access

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Dietary inflammatory index, inflammation biomarkers and preeclampsia risk: A hospital-based case-control study
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Dietary inflammatory index, inflammation biomarkers and preeclampsia risk: A hospital-based case-control study
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Dietary inflammatory index, inflammation biomarkers and preeclampsia risk: A hospital-based case-control study
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *