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Development of a food compositional database for the estimation of dietary intake of phyto-oestrogens in a group of postmenopausal women previously treated for breast cancer and validation with urinary excretion

  • Don B. Clarke (a1), Antony S. Lloyd (a2), Judy M. Lawrence (a3), Jonathan E. Brown (a4), Lesley Storey (a5), Monique Raats (a5), Richard M. Rainsbury (a6), D. J. Culliford (a7), Victoria A. Bailey-Horne (a2) (a8) and Barbara M. Parry (a6)...

Abstract

The scientific literature contains evidence suggesting that women who have been treated for breast cancer may, as a result of their diagnosis, increase their phyto-oestrogen (PE) intake. In the present paper, we describe the creation of a dietary analysis database (based on Dietplan6) for the determination of dietary intakes of specific PE (daidzein, genistein, glycitein, formononetin, biochanin A, coumestrol, matairesinol and secoisolariciresinol), in a group of women previously diagnosed and treated for postmenopausal breast cancer. The design of the database, data evaluation criteria, literature data entry for 551 foods and primary analysis by LC–MS/MS of an additional thirty-four foods for which there were no published data are described. The dietary intake of 316 women previously treated for postmenopausal breast cancer informed the identification of potential food and beverage sources of PE and the bespoke dietary analysis database was created to, ultimately, quantify their PE intake. In order that PE exposure could be comprehensively described, fifty-four of the 316 subjects completed a 24 h urine collection, and their urinary excretion results allowed for the description of exposure to include those identified as ‘equol producers’.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: D. B. Clarke, fax +44 1904 462111, email don.clarke@fera.gsi.gov.uk

References

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Development of a food compositional database for the estimation of dietary intake of phyto-oestrogens in a group of postmenopausal women previously treated for breast cancer and validation with urinary excretion

  • Don B. Clarke (a1), Antony S. Lloyd (a2), Judy M. Lawrence (a3), Jonathan E. Brown (a4), Lesley Storey (a5), Monique Raats (a5), Richard M. Rainsbury (a6), D. J. Culliford (a7), Victoria A. Bailey-Horne (a2) (a8) and Barbara M. Parry (a6)...

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