Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Bifidobacterium adolescentis supplementation ameliorates visceral fat accumulation and insulin sensitivity in an experimental model of the metabolic syndrome

  • Jinjin Chen (a1), Ren Wang (a2), Xiao-Fang Li (a3) and Rui-Liang Wang (a4)

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of Bifidobacterium adolescentis (Bif) supplementation on visceral fat accumulation and insulin sensitivity of the metabolic syndrome in HF-diet-fed rats. Adult male Wistar rats (n 10 per group) were fed four different experimental diets for 12 weeks as follows: standard diet; high-fat (HF) diet; a mix of HF diet and Bif; a mix of standard diet and Bif. Liver, mesenteric fat, epididymal fat, retroperitoneal fat, and inguinal fat, pancreas and triceps surae in all four groups of the rats were weighed, while liver steatosis and insulin sensitivity were evaluated at the end point of the study. As the number of intestinal Bifidobacterium species decreased obviously, fat pad weight and body weight increased significantly in the HF group compared with in the other three groups (P <0·05). Addition of Bif led to a reduction in body weight and fat pad weight (P <0·05). With an increase in liver weight, more severe steatosis of hepatocytes was observed in the HF group compared with in the other three groups. A significant decrease of the glucose infusion rate and pancreas weight was found in the HF group (P <0·05). This deleterious effect was alleviated when Bif was added to the diets. Bifidobacterium supplementation ameliorated visceral fat accumulation and insulin sensitivity of the metabolic syndrome in HF-diet-fed rats.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Bifidobacterium adolescentis supplementation ameliorates visceral fat accumulation and insulin sensitivity in an experimental model of the metabolic syndrome
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Bifidobacterium adolescentis supplementation ameliorates visceral fat accumulation and insulin sensitivity in an experimental model of the metabolic syndrome
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Bifidobacterium adolescentis supplementation ameliorates visceral fat accumulation and insulin sensitivity in an experimental model of the metabolic syndrome
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Dr J. Chen, fax +86 21 54222835, email jjvoo1974@gmail.com

References

Hide All
1 Kendall, CW, Josse, AR, Esfahani, A, et al. (2010) Nuts, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. Br J Nutr 104, 465473.
2 De Fronzo, RA & Ferrannini, E (1991) Insulin resistance. A multifaceted syndrome responsible for NIDDM, obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Diabetes Care 14, 173194.
3 Procopiou, M & Philippe, J (2005) The metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes: epidemiological figures and country specificities. Cerebrovasc Dis 20, 28.
4 Aude, YW, Mego, P & Mehta, JL (2004) Metabolic syndrome: dietary interventions. Curr Opin Cardiol 19, 473479.
5 Bray, GA & Bellanger, T (2006) Epidemiology, trends, and morbidities of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Endocrine 29, 109117.
6 Kahn, SE, Hull, RL & Utzschneider, KM (2006) Mechanisms linking obesity to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Nature 444, 840846.
7 Lender, D & Sysko, SK (2006) The metabolic syndrome and cardiometabolic risk: scope of the problem and current standard of care. Pharmacotherapy 26, 3S12S.
8 Moller, DE (2001) New drug targets for type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Nature 414, 821827.
9 Backhed, F, Ding, H, Wang, T, et al. (2004) The gut microbiota as an environmental factor that regulates fat storage. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101, 1571815723.
10 Backhed, F, Ley, RE, Sonnenburg, JL, et al. (2005) Host-bacterial mutualism in the human intestine. Science 307, 19151920.
11 Backhed, F, Manchester, JK, Semenkovich, CF, et al. (2007) Mechanisms underlying the resistance to diet-induced obesity in germ-free mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104, 979984.
12 Ley, RE, Backhed, F, Turnbaugh, P, et al. (2005) Obesity alters gut microbial ecology. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102, 1107011075.
13 Ley, RE, Turnbaugh, PJ, Klein, S, et al. (2006) Microbial ecology: human gut microbes associated with obesity. Nature 444, 10221023.
14 Cani, PD, Amar, J, Iglesias, MA, et al. (2007) Metabolic endotoxemia initiates obesity and insulin resistance. Diabetes 56, 17611772.
15 Griffiths, EA, Duffy, LC, Schanbacher, FL, et al. (2004) In vivo effects of bifidobacteria and lactoferrin on gut endotoxin concentration and mucosal immunity in Balb/c mice. Dig Dis Sci 49, 579589.
16 Wang, Z, Xiao, G, Yao, Y, et al. (2006) The role of bifidobacteria in gut barrier function after thermal injury in rats. J Trauma 61, 650657.
17 Hopkins, MJ, Sharp, R & Macfarlane, GT (2001) Age and disease related changes in intestinal bacterial populations assessed by cell culture, 16S rRNA abundance, and community cellular fatty acid profiles. Gut 48, 198205.
18 Chen, J, Cai, W & Feng, Y (2007) Development of intestinal bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in breast-fed neonates. Clin Nutr 26, 559566.
19 Lavoie, JM, Lord, M & Paulin, A (1988) Effect of selective hepatic vagotomy on plasma FFA levels in resting and exercising rats. Am J Physiol 254, R602R606.
20 De Fronzo, RA, Tobin, JD & Andres, R (1979) Glucose clamp technique: a method for quantifying insulin secretion and resistance. Am J Physiol 237, E214E223.
21 Kim, JY, Nolte, LA, Hansen, PA, et al. (2000) High-fat diet-induced muscle insulin resistance: relationship to visceral fat mass. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 279, R2057R2065.
22 Wang, ZT, Yao, YM, Xiao, GX, et al. (2004) Risk factors of development of gut-derived bacterial translocation in thermally injured rats. World J Gastroenterol 10, 16191624.
23 Brun, P, Castagliuolo, I, Leo, VD, et al. (2007) Increased intestinal permeability in obese mice: new evidence in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 292, G518G525.
24 Wu, J, Wang, X, Cai, W, et al. (2010) Bifidobacterium adolescentis supplementation ameliorates parenteral nutrition-induced liver injury in infant rabbits. Dig Dis Sci 55, 28142820.
25 Miyazaki, Y & De Fronzo, RA (2009) Visceral fat dominant distribution in male type 2 diabetic patients is closely related to hepatic insulin resistance, irrespective of body type. Cardiovasc Diabetol 8, 44.
26 Hanley, AJ, Wagenknecht, LE, Norris, JM, et al. (2009) Insulin resistance, beta cell dysfunction and visceral adiposity as predictors of incident diabetes: the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study (IRAS) Family study. Diabetologia 52, 20792086.
27 Nammi, S, Sreemantula, S & Roufogalis, BD (2009) Protective effects of ethanolic extract of Zingiber officinale rhizome on the development of metabolic syndrome in high-fat diet-fed rats. Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol 104, 366373.
28 Renna, NF, Vazquez, MA, Lama, MC, et al. (2009) Effect of chronic aspirin administration on an experimental model of metabolic syndrome. Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol 36, 162168.
29 Cani, PD, Knauf, C, Iglesias, MA, et al. (2006) Improvement of glucose tolerance and hepatic insulin sensitivity by oligofructose requires a functional glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor. Diabetes 55, 14841490.
30 Cani, PD, Daubioul, CA, Reusens, B, et al. (2005) Involvement of endogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 (7–36) amide on glycaemia-lowering effect of oligofructose in streptozotocin-treated rats. J Endocrinol 185, 457465.
31 Gillard, P, Vandemeulebroucke, E, Keymeulen, B, et al. (2009) Functional beta-cell mass and insulin sensitivity is decreased in insulin-independent pancreas–kidney recipients. Transplantation 87, 402407.
32 Ahren, B (2005) Type 2 diabetes, insulin secretion and beta-cell mass. Curr Mol Med 5, 275286.

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed