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Activities of enzymes of the pancreas, and the lumen and mucosa of the small intestine in growing broiler cockerels fed on tannin-containing diets

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

A. E. Ahmed
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Biochemistry and Nutrition, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne NEI 7RU
R. Smithard
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Biochemistry and Nutrition, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne NEI 7RU
M. Ellis
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Biochemistry and Nutrition, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne NEI 7RU
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Abstract

Diets containing vegetable tannins, predominantly hydrolysable gallotannins, at levels of 13.5, 25 and 50 g/kg were fed to growing broiler cockerels to examine their effect on enzymes in the pancreas, the intestinal lumen and the intestinal mucosa. Pancreas weight per unit live weight showed a significant (P < 0.05) increase with increasing level of dietary tannin while that of the liver remained unaffected. Trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) and α-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) activities in the pancreas of birds fed at the highest level of tannins were more than double those from birds fed on a tannin-free control diet. In the intestinal lumen inhibition of trypsin activity increased with increasing level of dietary tannin; α-amylase activity was inhibited at intermediate tannin levels but was restored at the highest level. Dipeptidase (EC 3.4.13.11) and sucrose α-glucosidase (disaccharidase) (EC 3.2.1.48) in the intestinal mucosa were both inhibited by tannins. Growth of the birds and digestibility of nitrogen were adversely affected by the tannin-containing diets.

Type
Diet and its Effects on Gastrointestinal Function
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1991

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Activities of enzymes of the pancreas, and the lumen and mucosa of the small intestine in growing broiler cockerels fed on tannin-containing diets
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