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Urinary flavanone concentrations as biomarkers of dietary flavanone intakes in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 December 2019

Iasim Tahiri
Affiliation:
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), 08908Barcelona, Spain
Yaiza Garro-Aguilar
Affiliation:
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), 08908Barcelona, Spain
Valerie Cayssials
Affiliation:
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), 08908Barcelona, Spain
David Achaintre
Affiliation:
Unit of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), 69008Lyon, France
Francesca Romana Mancini
Affiliation:
UMR 1018/Centre de recherche en Épidémiologie et Santé des Populations (CESP), Fac. de médecine, Univ. Paris-Sud, Fac. de médecine - Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (UVSQ), Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale (INSERM), Université Paris-Saclay, 94807Villejuif, France UMR 1018/Centre de recherche en Épidémiologie et Santé des Populations (CESP), Institut Gustave Roussy, 94805Villejuif, France
Yahya Mahamat-Saleh
Affiliation:
UMR 1018/Centre de recherche en Épidémiologie et Santé des Populations (CESP), Fac. de médecine, Univ. Paris-Sud, Fac. de médecine - Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (UVSQ), Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale (INSERM), Université Paris-Saclay, 94807Villejuif, France UMR 1018/Centre de recherche en Épidémiologie et Santé des Populations (CESP), Institut Gustave Roussy, 94805Villejuif, France
Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault
Affiliation:
UMR 1018/Centre de recherche en Épidémiologie et Santé des Populations (CESP), Fac. de médecine, Univ. Paris-Sud, Fac. de médecine - Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (UVSQ), Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale (INSERM), Université Paris-Saclay, 94807Villejuif, France UMR 1018/Centre de recherche en Épidémiologie et Santé des Populations (CESP), Institut Gustave Roussy, 94805Villejuif, France
Tilman Kühn
Affiliation:
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, 69120Heidelberg, Germany
Verena Katzke
Affiliation:
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, 69120Heidelberg, Germany
Heiner Boeing
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, 14558Nuthetal, Germany
Antonia Trichopoulou
Affiliation:
Hellenic Health Foundation, 11527Athens, Greece
Anna Karakatsani
Affiliation:
Hellenic Health Foundation, 11527Athens, Greece 2nd Pulmonary Medicine Department, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, “ATTIKON” University Hospital, 12462Haidari, Greece
Elisavet Valanou
Affiliation:
Hellenic Health Foundation, 11527Athens, Greece
Domenico Palli
Affiliation:
Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research, Prevention and Clinical Network - Istituto per lo studio, la prevenzione e la rete oncologica (ISPRO), 50139Florence, Italy
Sabina Sieri
Affiliation:
Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, 20133Milan, Italy
Maria Santucci de Magistris
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria (AOU) Federico II, 80131Naples, Italy
Rosario Tumino
Affiliation:
Cancer Registry and Histopathology Department, “M.P. Arezzzo” Hospital, ASP Ragusa, 97100Ragusa, Italy
Alessandra Macciotta
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, 10124Turin, Italy
Inge Huybrechts
Affiliation:
Unit of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), 69008Lyon, France
Antonio Agudo
Affiliation:
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), 08908Barcelona, Spain
Augustin Scalbert
Affiliation:
Unit of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), 69008Lyon, France
Raul Zamora-Ros
Affiliation:
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), 08908Barcelona, Spain
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

In the present study, the aim was to investigate the correlation between the acute and habitual dietary intake of flavanones, their main food sources and the concentrations of aglycones naringenin and hesperetin in 24 h urine in a European population. A 24-h dietary recall (24-HDR) and a 24-h urine sample were collected the same day from a subsample of 475 people from four different countries of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Acute and habitual dietary data were captured through a standardised 24-HDR and a country/centre-specific validated dietary questionnaire (DQ). The intake of dietary flavanones was estimated using the Phenol-Explorer database. Urinary flavanones (naringenin and hesperetin) were analysed using tandem MS with a previous enzymatic hydrolysis. Weak partial correlation coefficients were found between urinary flavanone concentrations and both acute and habitual dietary flavanone intakes (Rpartial = 0·14–0·17). Partial correlations were stronger between urinary excretions and acute intakes of citrus fruit and juices (Rpartial ∼ 0·6) than with habitual intakes of citrus fruit and juices (Rpartial ∼ 0·24). In conclusion, according to our results, urinary excretion of flavanones can be considered a good biomarker of acute citrus intake. However, low associations between habitual flavanone intake and urinary excretion suggest a possible inaccurate estimation of their intake or a too sporadic intake. For assessing habitual exposures, multiple urinary collections may be needed. These results show that none of the approaches tested is ideal, and the use of both DQ and biomarkers can be recommended.

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Full Papers
Copyright
© The Authors 2019

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Footnotes

These authors contributed equally to this work.

References

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