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Dietary and serum vitamin D and preeclampsia risk in Chinese pregnant women: a matched case–control study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 August 2021

Xue-Min Huang
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450000, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Yan-Hua Liu*
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Han Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450000, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Yuan Cao
Affiliation:
The Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Wei-Feng Dou
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450000, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Dan-Dan Duan
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Luoyang New Area People’s Hospital, Luoyang 471023, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Hua-Nan Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450000, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Yacong Bo
Affiliation:
Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong 999077, People’s Republic of China
Adwoa N. Amoah
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450000, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Wen-Jun Fu
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Xian-Lan Zhao
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan, People’s Republic of China
Fang-Fang Zeng
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No.601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China
Yu-Ming Chen
Affiliation:
Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Food, Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080, People’s Republic of China
Quan-Jun Lyu*
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450000, Henan, People’s Republic of China Department of Nutrition, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan, People’s Republic of China
*
* Corresponding authors: Yan-hua Liu, email liuyanhua1015@163.com; Quan-Jun Lyu, email lvquanjun666@163.com
* Corresponding authors: Yan-hua Liu, email liuyanhua1015@163.com; Quan-Jun Lyu, email lvquanjun666@163.com

Abstract

The effect of vitamin D (VD) on the risk of preeclampsia (PE) is uncertain. Few of previous studies focused on the relationship between dietary VD intake and PE risk. Therefore, we conducted this 1:1 matched case–control study to explore the association of dietary VD intake and serum VD concentrations with PE risk in Chinese pregnant women. A total of 440 pairs of participants were recruited during March 2016 to June 2019. Dietary information was obtained using a seventy-eight-item semi-quantitative FFQ. Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 were measured by liquid chromatography–tandem MS. Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to estimate OR and 95 % CI. Restricted cubic splines (RCS) were plotted to evaluate the dose–response relationship of dietary VD intake and serum VD concentrations with PE risk. Compared with the lowest quartile, the OR of the highest quartile were 0·45 (95 % CI 0·29, 0·71, P trend = 0·001) for VD dietary intake and 0·26 (95 % CI 0·11, 0·60, P trend = 0·003) for serum levels after adjusting for confounders. In addition, the RCS analysis suggested a reverse J-shaped relationship between dietary VD intake and PE risk (P-nonlinearity = 0·02). A similar association was also found between serum concentrations of total 25(OH)D and PE risk (P-nonlinearity = 0·02). In conclusion, this study provides evidence that higher dietary intake and serum levels of VD are associated with the lower risk of PE in Chinese pregnant women.

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Full Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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