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Why Music Educators Really Understand Skills

  • MARTIN FAUTLEY

Extract

The issue of knowledge and skills as competing factors in education has been considered in BJME editorials previously, notably 30(2) and 33(2) (Fautley & Murphy, 2013, 2016). This is a matter which not only affects the English system specifically, however, as there are strains of it being felt in many jurisdictions throughout the world. It is worth revisiting in this editorial because of a number of elements of the ways in which conceptualisations of this dichotomy are influencing what is enacted in policy. This is having an impact at both the macro and micro levels in and between schools and education systems (Schmidt, 2017).

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References

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FAUTLEY, M. & MURPHY, R. (2013). Editorial. British Journal of Music Education, 30 (2), 157159. doi:10.1017/S0265051713000168
FAUTLEY, M. & MURPHY, R. (2016). The nature of music itself, and the knowledge versus skills debate in music education. British Journal of Music Education, 33 (2), 129132. doi:10.1017/S026505171600022X
FAUTLEY, M. (2017). ‘Notation and Music Education,’ British Journal of Music Education. Cambridge University Press, 34 (2), pp. 123126. doi: 10.1017/S0265051717000031.
Campbell, D. (1976). Assessing the Impact of Planned Social Change. Social Research and Public Policies: The Dartmouth/ OECD Conference. G. Lyons. Hanover, NH, Public Affairs Center, Dartmouth College.
Finn, M. (2016). “Atmospheres of progress in a data-based school.” cultural geographies 23(1): 29–49.
Schmidt, P. K. (2017). Why Policy Matters. Policy and the Political Life of Music Education. Schmidt, P. K. and Colwell, R.. New York, Oxford University Press: 11–36.
Swanwick, K. (1999). Teaching music musically. London, Routledge.

Why Music Educators Really Understand Skills

  • MARTIN FAUTLEY

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