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Craft, process and art: Teaching and learning music composition in higher education

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2010

Abstract

This paper explores models of teaching and learning music composition in higher education. It analyses the pedagogical approaches apparent in the literature on teaching and learning composition in schools and universities, and introduces a teaching model as: learning from the masters; mastery of techniques; exploring ideas; and developing voice. It then presents a learning model developed from a qualitative study into students’ experiences of learning composition at university as: craft, process and art. The relationship between the students’ experiences and the pedagogical model is examined. Finally, the implications for composition curricula in higher education are presented.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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