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Transition to Community Living After Acquired Brain Injury

  • Louise Gustafsson (a1) and Jennifer Fleming (a1) (a2) (a3)

Extract

Enter the word ‘transition’ into an internet search engine and you will be overwhelmed by the number of web pages that talk about transitions from an economical, scientific, literary or organisational perspective (just to name a few). Common to the description of transition from the differing perspectives is the inclusion of the terms movement and/or change from one state to the next. It is important that healthcare professionals who work with people with both traumatic and nontraumatic brain injury appreciate and understand that from the point of brain insult, the patient and their family will experience multiple transitions involving movement or change in ‘state’, such as changes to roles and altering levels of participation and activity.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Address for correspondence: Dr Louise Gustafsson, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, 4072, Australia. E-mail: l.gustafsson@uq.edu.au

References

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National Stroke Foundation. (2007). Walk in our shoes. Stroke survivors and carers report on support after stroke [Online]. Retrieved from http://www.strokefoundation.com.au/component/option,com_docman/Itemid,39/task,cat_view/gid,61/
Turner, B., Fleming, J., Worrall, L., Cornwell, P., Haines, T., Ownsworth, T., Kendall, M., & Chenoweth, L. (2007). A qualitative study of the transition from hospital to home for individuals with acquired brain injury and their family caregivers. Brain Injury, 21, 11191130.
World Health Organization. (2001). International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: ICF. Geneva: Author.

Transition to Community Living After Acquired Brain Injury

  • Louise Gustafsson (a1) and Jennifer Fleming (a1) (a2) (a3)

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