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Diaspora and peer support working: benefits of and challenges for the Butabika–East London Link

  • Dave Baillie (a1), Mariam Aligawesa (a2), Harriet Birabwa-Oketcho (a3), Cerdic Hall (a4), David Kyaligonza (a3), Richard Mpango (a3), Moses Mulimira (a5) and Jed Boardman (a6)...

Abstract

The International Health Partnership (‘the Link’) between the East London NHS Foundation Trust and Butabika Hospital in Uganda was set up in 2005. It has facilitated staff exchanges and set up many workstreams (e.g. in child and adolescent psychiatry, nursing and psychology) and projects (e.g. a peer support worker project and a violence reduction programme). The Link has been collaborative and mutually beneficial. The authors describe benefits and challenges at individual and organisational levels. Notably, the Link has achieved a commitment to service user involvement and an increasingly central involvement of the Ugandan diaspora working in mental health in the UK.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

References

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All Parliamentary Party Group on Global Health (2014) Patient Empowerment: For Better Quality, More Sustainable Services Globally. Available at http://www.appg-globalhealth.org.uk/reports/4556656050 (accessed 30 October 2014).
Baillie, D., Boardman, J., Onen, T., et al (2009) NHS Links: achievements of one London mental health trust and Uganda. Psychiatric Bulletin, 33, 265269.
Baillie, D., Hall, C., Hunter, N., et al (2013) Brain gain: the benefits of working as a peer support worker for service users in urban Uganda. Paper presented at the Global Mental Health Conference, September 2013. Available at http://www.centreforglobalmentalhealth.org/sites/www.centreforglobalmentalhealth.org/files/uploads/documents/5A%20Peer-delivered%20interventions-%20Ballie.pdf (accessed 30 October 2014).
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Diaspora and peer support working: benefits of and challenges for the Butabika–East London Link

  • Dave Baillie (a1), Mariam Aligawesa (a2), Harriet Birabwa-Oketcho (a3), Cerdic Hall (a4), David Kyaligonza (a3), Richard Mpango (a3), Moses Mulimira (a5) and Jed Boardman (a6)...
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