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Revenge and forgiveness or betrayal blindness?

  • Sasha Johnson-Freyd (a1) and Jennifer J. Freyd (a2)

Abstract

McCullough et al. hypothesize that evolution has selected mechanisms for revenge to deter harms and for forgiveness to preserve valuable relationships. However, in highly dependent relationships, the more adaptive course of action may be to remain unaware of the initial harm rather than risk alienating a needed other. We present a testable model of possible victim responses to interrelational harm.

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DePrince, A. P., Brown, L. S., Cheit, R. E., Freyd, J. J., Gold, S. N., Pezdek, K. & Quina, K. (2012) Motivated forgetting and misremembering: Perspectives from Betrayal Trauma Theory. In: True and false recovered memories: Toward a reconciliation of the debate. Nebraska Symposium on Motivation 58, ed. Belli, R. F., pp. 193243. Springer.
Ekman, P. & O'Sullivan, M. (2006) From flawed self-assessment to blatant whoppers: The utility of voluntary and involuntary behavior in detecting deception. Behavioral Sciences and the Law 24:673–86.
Freyd, J. J. (1996) Betrayal trauma: The logic of forgetting childhood abuse. Harvard University Press.
Freyd, J. J., DePrince, A. P. & Gleaves, D. (2007) The state of betrayal trauma theory: Reply to McNally (2007) – Conceptual issues and future directions. Memory 15:295311.

Revenge and forgiveness or betrayal blindness?

  • Sasha Johnson-Freyd (a1) and Jennifer J. Freyd (a2)

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