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Behavioural inhibition and valuation of gain/loss are neurally distinct from approach/withdrawal

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 August 2019

Neil McNaughton
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealandneil.mcnaughton@otago.ac.nzhttp://www.otago.ac.nz/psychology/staff/neilmcnaughton.html
Philip J. Corr
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, City, University of London, London EC1R 0JD, United Kingdom. Philip.Corr.1@city.ac.ukhttps://www.city.ac.uk/people/academics/philip-corr
Corresponding

Abstract

Gain or omission/termination of loss produces approach; while loss or omission/termination of gain produces withdrawal. Control of approach/withdrawal motivation is distinct from valuation of gain/loss and does not entail learning – making “reward” and “punishment” ambiguous. Approach-withdrawal goal conflict engages a neurally distinct Behavioural Inhibition System, which controls “anxiety” (conflict/passive avoidance) but not “fear” (withdrawal/active avoidance).

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Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2019 

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