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An all-positive correlation matrix is not evidence of domain-general intelligence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 August 2017

Rosalind Arden
Affiliation:
London School of Economics & Political Science, London, WC2A 2AE, United Kingdomr.arden@lse.ac.uk
Brendan P. Zietsch
Affiliation:
University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072Australiazietsch@psy.uq.edu.au

Abstract

We welcome the cross-disciplinary approach taken by Burkart et al. to probe the evolution of intelligence. We note several concerns: the uses of g and G, rank-ordering species on cognitive ability, and the meaning of general intelligence. This subject demands insights from several fields, and we look forward to cross-disciplinary collaborations.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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An all-positive correlation matrix is not evidence of domain-general intelligence
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