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Indigenous Knowledge Studies and the Next Generation: Pedagogical Possibilites for Anti-Colonial Education

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 July 2015

George J. Sefa Dei*
Affiliation:
Sociology and Equity Studies, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1V6, Canada
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Abstract

This paper raises issues pertaining to our collective responsibilities in nurturing the next generation of Indigenous scholars. It highlights aspects of current theorising of Indigenity, namely, the search for “epistemological equity” through reclamation of identity, knowledge and politics of embodiment; and discusses how knowledge about our own existence, realities and identities can help produce a form of knowing legitimate in its own right and able to contest other ways of knowing. The paper concludes with what I see as some of the pedagogical possibilities of anti-colonial education using the Indigenous framework.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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