Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Language Policy and Planning: Political Perspectives

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 November 2008

Extract

Since World War II, the political order that divided the world into nationstates has been remarkably stable. The balance of terror during the Cold War prevented major changes in the world system. With minor exceptions, such as the emergence of Singapore as an independent polity shortly after the foundation of Malaysia and the breakup of highly artificial geographically divided Pakistan into two separate states, even most of the countries that had come into existence as the result of decolonization did not change their borders. However, while the bi-polar system of the political and military stand-off of the two superpowers continued, a triangular world system developed on the economic plane. During the 1970s Japan became a major economic force, while the integration of the European Economic Community continued. Since the end of World War II, the United States has had close economic ties with both of the economic powers.


Type
Foundations of Language Policy and Planning
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1994

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Adams, K. L. and Brink, D. T. (eds.) 1990. Perspectives on Official English. The campaign for English as the official language of the USA. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Barrera i Vidal, A. 1991. Le Catalan, une langue d'Europe. [Catalan, a European language]. Sociolinguistica. 5.99110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bright, W. 1991. Small linguistic societies from a global perspective. IT and mass media for small linguistic societies. EMI. 29.1118.Google Scholar
Bugarski, R. 1990. The social basis of language conflict and language attitudes. In Nelde, P. H. (ed.) Language attitudes and language conflict. Bonn: Dümmler. 4147.Google Scholar
Calvet, L. J. 1986. Typologie des politiques linguistiques. [Typology of language policies]. In Gruenais, M. P. (ed.) États de langue. Peut-on penser une politique linguistique?. [The state of the language. Can a language policy be envisaged?] Paris: Fondation Diderot Fayard. 1746.Google Scholar
Clyne, M. 1991a. Community languages: The Australian experience. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clyne, M. (ed.) 1991b. Pluricentric languages: Differing norms in different nations. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cooper, R. L. 1989. Language planning and social change. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Coulmas, F. 1989. The surge of Japanese. International Journal of the Sociology of Language. 80.115131.Google Scholar
Coulmas, F. 1991. European integration and the idea of the national language. In Coulmas, F. (ed.) A language policy for the European Community. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. 143.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Couttenier, I. 1989. Belgian politics in 1988. Res Publica. 302328.Google Scholar
Danzin, A. 1992. Vers une infrastructure linguistique européenne. Rapport pour La Commission des Communautis Européennes. [Towards a linguistic infrastructure for Europe. Report for the Commission of the European Communities]. Brussels: European Community.[ European Community Document DG XIII.]Google Scholar
Daoust, D. 1990. A decade of language planning in Quebec: A sociopolitical overview. In Weinstein, B. (ed.) Language policy and political development. Norwood, NJ: Ablex. 108130.Google Scholar
De Bot, K., and Fase, W. (eds.) 1991. Migrant languages in Western Europe. [Special issue of International Journal of the Sociology of Language. 90.]Google Scholar
De, Vries J. 1987. Problems of measurement in the study of linguistic minorities. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development. 8.1/2.2331.Google Scholar
Deprez, K. and Wynants, A.. 1991. Flamand ou neerlandais (de Flandre)? [Flemish or Dutch (of Flanders)?] In Chirobli, J. (ed.) CORTI90, Actes du colloque international des languages polynomiques. [Proceedings of the international symposium on polynymous languages.]Corska:University de Corse. 113126.Google Scholar
Djité, P. G. 1990. The place of African languages in the revival of the Francophonie movement. International Journal of the Sociology of Language. 86.87102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
European, Parliament 1990. Language in the Community. Resolution adopted by the European Parliament on languages in the Community and the situation of Catalan. Luxembourg: European Parliament. [A3-016990.]Google Scholar
Extra, G. and Verhoeven, L. (eds.) 1992. Immigrant languages in Europe. Clevedon, Avon: Multilingual Matter.Google Scholar
Fishman, J. A. 1988. ‘English only’: Its ghosts, myths, and dangers. International Journal of the Sociology of Language. 74.125140.Google Scholar
Fishman, J. A. 1989. Language and ethnicity in minority sociolinguistic perspective. Clevedon, Avon: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Fukuyama, F. 1989. The end of history. National Interest. Summer 1989, 318.Google Scholar
Grillo, R. D. 1989. Dominant languages: Language and hierarchy in Britain and France. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Gubert, R. 1992. Processi di globalizzazione ed appartenenza etnica. [Globalization and ethnic affiliation.] In Adige, A. (ed.) Relazioni interetniche: Vivre in una società plurilingue. Atti degli incontri all'Accademia ´92. [Interethnic relations: Living in a multilingual society. Proceedings of the Academy discussions ´92.]Bressanone:Accademia Cusanus 147155.Google Scholar
Kelman, H. C. 1972. Language as aid and as barrier to involvement in the national system. In Fishman, J. A. (ed.) Advances in the sociology of language. Vol. 2. The Hague: Mouton. 185212.Google Scholar
Koch, H. 1991. Legal aspects of a language policy for the European Community. In Coulmas, F. (ed.) A language policy for the European Community. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. 147161.Google Scholar
Laponce, J. A. 1987. Languages and their territories. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.Google Scholar
Lo Bianco, J. 1987. National policy on languages. Canberra: Australian Government Printing Service.Google Scholar
Lo Bianco, J. 1990. Making language policy: Australia's experience. In Baldauf, R. B. and Luke, A. (eds.) Language planning and education in Australasia and the South Pacific Clevedon, Avon: Multilingual Matters. 4779.Google Scholar
Marshall, D. F. 1986. The question of an official language: Language rights and the English Language Amendment. International Journal of the Sociology of Language. 60.775.Google Scholar
Moeliono, A. M. 1991. Standardization and modernization in Indonesian language planning. Paper presented at the international symposium Eléments pour une théorie de la standardisation linguistique. [Elements of a theory of language standardization.] Académie Suisse des Sciences Humaines. April 1991.Google Scholar
Pons-Ridler, S. and Ridler, N. B. 1987. The territorial concept of official bilingualism: A cheaper alternative for Canada. In Tonkin, H. and Johnson-Weiner, K. M. (eds.) The economics of language use. New York: Center for Research and Documentation on World Language Problems. 95105.Google Scholar
Rial, J. 1985. Spain: Regional languages in a lingua franca dominant state. In Beer, W. R. and Jacob, J. E. (eds.) Language policy and national unity. Totowa, NJ: Rowman & Allanheld. 97105.Google Scholar
Robins, R. H. and Uhlenbeck, E. M. (eds.) 1991. Endangered languages. New York: Berg.Google Scholar
Schmidt-Häuser, C. 1989. Ein Volk kampft fur seine Sprache. [A people fights for its language.] Die Zeit. November 17, p. 14.Google Scholar
Shiels, F. L. 1984. Ethnic separatism and world politics. New York: University Press of America.Google Scholar
Strubell-Trueta, M. 1991. Standardisation and national identity: The conflict in Valencia. Paper presented at the international symposium Eléments pour une théorie de la standardisation linguistique. [Elements of a theory of language standardization.] Académie Suisse des Sciences Humaines. April 1991.Google Scholar
Sun, H. 1992. Language recognition and nationality. International Journal of the Sociology of Language. 97.922.Google Scholar
Tabouret-Keller, A. 1991. Factors of constraints and freedom in setting a language policy for the European Community: A sociolinguistic approach. In Coulmas, F. (ed.) A language policy for the European Community. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. 4557.Google Scholar
Tessarolo, M. 1990. Minoranze linguistiche e immagine della lingua. Una ricerca sulla realà italiana. [Linguistic minorities and images of language. An inquiry of the situation in Italy.] Milano: Franco Angeli.Google Scholar
The Economist. 1991. Canada survey. Nice country, nice mess. (June 29th) 3ff.Google Scholar
Tollefson, J. W. 1991. Planning language, planning inequality: Language policy in the community. New York: Longman.Google Scholar
Truchot, C. 1990. L'anglais dans le monde contemporain. [English in the world today.] Paris: Le Robert.Google Scholar
Truchot, C. 1991. Towards a language policy for the European Community. In Marshall, D. F. (ed.) Language planning. Focusschrift in honor of Joshua A. Fishman on the occasion of his 65th birthday. Amsterdam: Benjamins. 87104.Google Scholar
van Deth, J. P. 1991. Aspects politiques du plurilinguisme en Europe. [Political aspects of multilingualism in Europe.] Sociolinguistica. 5.16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Van Hasselt, F. 1991. Turkse taalwet dank 2ij druk VS. [Turkish language law thanks to US pressure.] NRC Handelsblad. 02 12.Google Scholar
Verwey, W. 1987. Kwestie-Happart veroorzaakt opnieuw crisissfeer [Happart- question again causes atmosphere of crisis.] NRC Handelsblad. September 25.Google Scholar
Wardhaugh, R. 1987. Languages in competition. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Weinstein, B. 1990. Language policy and political development: An overview. Language policy and political development. In Weinstein, B. (ed.) Norwood, NJ: Ablex. 121.Google Scholar
Wolfson, N. and Manes, J. (eds.) 1985. Language of inequality. Berlin: Mouton.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 102 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 2nd December 2020. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-79f79cbf67-n2swh Total loading time: 0.333 Render date: 2020-12-02T01:21:09.004Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Wed Dec 02 2020 01:04:53 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": false, "languageSwitch": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Language Policy and Planning: Political Perspectives
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Language Policy and Planning: Political Perspectives
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Language Policy and Planning: Political Perspectives
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *