Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Delphica1

  • John Pollard

Extract

One of the most arresting natural features at Delphi is the great rock pulpit which projects between the ruins of the Bouleuterion and the terrace walls supporting Apollo's temple (Plate 51b). It is rent on its southern side by a large fissure up which was hewn a flight of still discernible steps. The area in which it stands is of more than ordinary interest, as being identifiable with τὸ τᾶς Γᾶς ἱερρόν mentioned in a Delphic inscription dating from the fourth century B.C. On the rock itself the Sibyl, variously identified, was said to have sat (or stood) and prophesied. Yet most modern Delphic historians, while devoting much space to the Pythia, and to the obscure details of the oracle's mechanism, either have tended to ignore the Sibyl altogether, or have dismissed her from serious consideration with a few brief words as an unimportant late-comer. Some indeed have come near to identifying her with the Pythia. One actually did.

Copyright

References

Hide All

2 The identity of the rock was established by Homolle, , BCH xvii. 613, and has not been challenged.

3 FD iii. 5, 25, col. iii, A, 1, 3, 4.

4 Cf., for example, Parke, and Wormell, , The Delphic Oracle i. 13.

5 E.g. Holland, L. B., AJA xxxvii (1933) 201, who describes the Pythia loosely as a ‘sibyl’.

6 Bergk, , Griech. Lit. i. 342 and n. 90, refuted by Rohde, Psyche n. 64 to ch. ix (Eng. ed.).

7 FHG ii. 197. Clem. Alex. Strom. i. 139, 48.

8 Stoic. vet. frg. ii. 348 (nr. 1216) Arnim = Varro ap. Lactant. Div. inst. i. 6, 9.

9 398c.

10 x. 12.

11 Cf. Maass, , De Sibyllarum Indicibus 36 ff.

12 De Pyth. Orac. 397a.

13 Cf. Rohde, loc. cit.

14 1095, 1116.

15 244d.

16 De defect. or. 438a.

17 E.g. Amandry, , La Mantique apollinienne à Delphes 42 ff.

18 Cf. Amandry, op. cit. 193.

19 Cf. Amandry, op. cit. 42.

20 124d.

21 Prob. 30, 1. 954a.

22 Op. cit. p. 23.

23 Cf. Frazer ad Paus. x. 12, 1; Buchholz, in Roscher, , Myth. Lex. iv. 793; Rzach in R.E. s.v. Sibyllen, 2082–3.

24 Strabo 604, 616.

25 Phlegon, Olymp. frg. 2. FGH iii. 604.

26 Frg. 97 Voss. Varro ap. Lactant. op. cit. 1. 6, 12.

27 Varro ap. Lactant. op. cit. 1. 6, 8.

28 x. 12.

29 Clem. Alex. Strom. i. 108, 3.

30 Lactant. op. cit. i. 6, 9.

31 FGH iv. 309; Lactant. ibid.

32 Cf. Maass, op. cit. 60.

33 Herakleitos ap. Plut. (n. 12),

34 Cf. Bouché-Leclercq, , Hist. de la Div. i. 351.

35 Cf. Guthrie, , The Greeks and their Gods 204.

36 Hymn to Hermes 564 f.

37 Paus. vii. 3; Schol. Ap. Rhod. i. 308. The story, as Mr. Huxley reminds me, may be as old as Antimachos of Teos.

38 Suidas sub

39 Cf. Suidas sub

40 Cf. Nilsson, , Gesch. 2 i. 620; Amandry, op. cit. 193; Parke and Wormell, op. cit. i. 13.

41 Strabo 243.

42 Cf. Cooke, R. M., JHS lxvi. 77.

43 For a recent and plausible view cf. Will, E., Korinthiaka 403.

44 Herod. i. 18.

45 Op. cit. 59.

46 vii. 91, 13 (Helm).

47 i. 5 ext. 1. Cf. Huxley, G. L., GRBS 2 (1959) 95.

48 Cf. Reinach, , REG 1891, 276 ff.; Buresch, , AM 1892, 16 ff.

49 Herod. i. 46 ff.

50 Paus. x. 12, 4.

51 Ap. Serv. ad Aen. vi. 36.

52 Mart. Cap. ii. 40.

53 Lactant. op. cit. i. 6, 18.

54 Imhoof-Blumer, , Ztschr. f. Numism. xx. 279 f., nr. 32.

55 Satyr. 48.

56 Cf. Bücheler, , RhMus lvii. 327. For the legend of the Sibyl's preservation in a bottle cf. Ovid, , Met. xiv. 132 ff.

57 Cf. Forrest, W. G., Historia, 1957, 172 ff; Huxley, op. cit. 96.

58 Cf. n. 7; Huxley, op. cit. 95.

59 FGH ii. 216, Pollux 9. 83.

60 Herod. i. 14. I accept here a revised stemma for the Phrygian dynasty suggested to me by Mr. G. Huxley. Cf., however, Huxley, op. cit. 94.

61 x. 9, 6.

62 Cf. Frazer, ad loc.

63 Cf. Daux, G., Pausarias à Delphes 86 ff.

64 Thuc. vi. 95.

65 Herod. i. 82.

66 Herod. v. 90.

67 Livy v. 13. 5–6.

68 Cf. n. 14.

69 Paus. x. 9, 5.

70 Lactant. op. cit. i. 6, 14; De Ira Dei 22, 6.

71 Tac. Ann. vi. 12.

72 Aesch. Eum. 1 ff.

73 Chronique des fouilles, BCH lxiii (1939) ii. 310–11.

1 I would like to acknowledge here the debt which I owe to Dr. L. H. Jeffery and Mr. W. G. Forrest for their valuable criticism and advice; to Messrs. G. Huxley and B. R. I. Sealey for generously drawing my attention to much important material; to Professor H. J. Rose for reading the article in its original form, and giving me, as always, the benefit of his unrivalled scholarship; and finally, and not least, to Mr. W. F. Jackson Knight who first roused my interest in the Sibyl.

Delphica1

  • John Pollard

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed