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Effects of whole linseed and rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid enriched diets on beef quality

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 November 2015

M. Barahona
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Production and Food Science, Instituto Agroalimentario (IA2), Universidad de Zaragoza-CITA, Miguel Servet 177, 50013 Zaragoza, Spain
J. L. Olleta
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Production and Food Science, Instituto Agroalimentario (IA2), Universidad de Zaragoza-CITA, Miguel Servet 177, 50013 Zaragoza, Spain
C. Sañudo
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Production and Food Science, Instituto Agroalimentario (IA2), Universidad de Zaragoza-CITA, Miguel Servet 177, 50013 Zaragoza, Spain
P. Albertí
Affiliation:
Unidad de Tecnología en Producción Animal, CITA Gobierno de Aragón, Avenida de Montañana 930, 50059 Zaragoza, Spain
B. Panea
Affiliation:
Unidad de Tecnología en Producción Animal, CITA Gobierno de Aragón, Avenida de Montañana 930, 50059 Zaragoza, Spain
M. Pérez-Juan
Affiliation:
IRTA. Finca Camps i Arnet, 17121 Monells, Spain
C. E. Realini
Affiliation:
IRTA. Finca Camps i Arnet, 17121 Monells, Spain
M. M. Campo
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Production and Food Science, Instituto Agroalimentario (IA2), Universidad de Zaragoza-CITA, Miguel Servet 177, 50013 Zaragoza, Spain
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Abstract

Instrumental assessments and sensory tests were performed to evaluate the effects of diet and postmortem ageing time (1, 7 and 21 days) on beef quality. A total of 48 Friesian calves were randomly allocated to four dietary treatments: control, whole linseed (10% linseed), conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) (2% protected CLA), and whole linseed+CLA (10% linseed and 2% protected CLA). Animals were slaughtered at 458±16.6 kg live weight and 11 months of age. Ageing was more significant than diet on most instrumental parameters. Meat from linseed enriched diets had greater drip loss (P⩽0.001) and intramuscular fat (P⩽0.01) than meat from animals fed CLA. Beef aged for 7 and 21 days had lower cooking losses (P⩽0.01) and shear force (P⩽0.001) than beef aged for 1 day. Lightness was affected only by display time. The addition of CLA in the diet increased hue and yellowness, whereas the inclusion of linseed decreased these values, as well as increased redness. Linseed in the diet decreased fat odour (P⩽0.05), but increased beef (P⩽0.01) and liver (P⩽0.05) flavours. Meat aged for 21 days was significantly more rancid (P⩽0.001), even under vacuum storage. Several organoleptic properties were improved with the inclusion of linseed in the diet, whereas they remained unaffected by the inclusion of CLA.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Animal Consortium 2015 

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