Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684bc48f8b-4z9h4 Total loading time: 0.309 Render date: 2021-04-11T17:17:39.054Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Article contents

Economic implications of using Japanese Black sires carrying recessive genes associated with genetic defects

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 2008

M. Nishio
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Husbandry Resources, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto, Japan
A. K. Kahi
Affiliation:
Animal Breeding and Genetics Group, Department of Animal Sciences, Egerton University, P.O. Box 536, 20115 Egerton, Kenya
H. Hirooka
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Husbandry Resources, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, 606-8502 Kyoto, Japan
Corresponding
Get access

Abstract

The objective of this study was to calculate cumulative discounted expressions (CDE) for Japanese Black sires carrying a single defective allele in a herd by applying the gene-flow method to investigate the expression pattern of homozygous recessive genotype and to evaluate the monetary loss of using these sires. A single biallelic locus was considered with A representing the dominant allele and a representing the recessive allele. The gene-flow method was modified to consider the fitness of homozygous recessive genotype. Input parameters representing a typical situation in a Japanese Black cattle herd were used to calculate the CDE and the loss of using carrier sires. The effects of initial allele frequency and fitness on the CDE were determined for Aa and AA sires. The CDE of Aa sires were larger than those of AA sires under all initial allele frequencies and fitness. The difference in the CDE between using Aa and AA sires was largest when fitness was 0 (lethal recessive condition). The differences in the loss between Aa and AA sires were larger with increasing initial allele frequencies in lethal recessive condition. Applying the method used in this study to defects reported in Japanese Black cattle and with a population size of 628 000, the difference in the loss between using Aa and AA sires was US$48 575 800 and US$74 418 000 in the case of Band-3 and Claudin-16 deficiencies, respectively. The approach used in this study could be applied to other genetic defects in different breeds and species.

Type
Full Paper
Copyright
Copyright © The Animal Consortium 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Amer, PR 1999. Economic accounting of numbers of expressions and delays in sheep genetic improvement. New Zealand Journal of Agricultural Research 42, 325336.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Amer, PR, Simm, G, Keane, MG, Diskin, MG, Wickham, BW 2001. Breeding objectives for beef cattle in Ireland. Livestock Production Science 67, 223239.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berry, DP, Madalena, FE, Cromie, AR, Amer, PR 2006. Cumulative discounted expressions of dairy and beef traits in cattle production systems. Livestock Science 99, 159174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ghanem, ME, Nishiobori, M, Nakao, T, Nakatani, K, Akita, M 2005. Factor XI mutation in a Holstein cow with repeat breeding in Japan. Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 67, 713715.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Groen, AF 1990. Influences of production circumstances on the economic revenue of cattle breeding programmes. Animal Production 51, 469480.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hill, WG 1974. Prediction and evaluation of response to selection with overlapping generations. Animal Production 18, 117139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kearney, JF, Amer, PR, Villanueva, B 2005. Cumulative discounted expressions of sire genotypes for the complex vertebral malformation and β-casein loci in commercial dairy herds. Journal of Dairy Science 88, 44264433.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kobayashi, N, Hirano, T, Maruyama, S, Matsune, H, Mukoujima, K, Morimoto, H, Nakayama, T, Sugimoto, Y 2000. Genetic mapping of locus associated with bovine chronic interstitial nephritis to chromosome 1. Animal Genetics 31, 9195.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kunieda, T 2005. Identification of genes responsible for hereditary diseases in Japanese beef cattle. Animal Science Journal 76, 525533.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kunieda, M, Tsuji, T, Abbasi, AR, Khalaj, MK, Ikeda, M, Miyadera, K, Ogawa, H, Kunieda, T 2005. An insertion mutation of the bovine F11 gene is responsible for factor XI deficiency in Japanese Black cattle. Mammalian Genome 16, 383389.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Larzul, C, Manfredi, E, Elsen, JM 1997. Potential gain from including major gene information in breeding value estimation. Genetics, Selection, Evolution 29, 161184.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
LIAJ (Livestock Improvement Association of Japan) 2001. Results of DNA tests for genetic disease genes. LIAJ, Tokyo, Japan.Google Scholar
MAFF (Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries, Japan) 2005. Cost of animal products. MAFF, Tokyo, Japan.Google Scholar
McClintock, AE, Cunningham, EP 1974. Selection for dual purpose cattle populations: defining the breeding objective. Animal Production 18, 237247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nishio M, Kahi AK and Hirooka H 2008. Accounting for numbers of expressions of specific genotypes using a modified gene-flow method. Livestock Science (in press).Google Scholar
Ogawa, H, Tu, CH, Kagamizono, H, Soki, K, Inoue, Y, Alatsuki, H, Nagata, S, Wada, T, Ikeya, M, Makimura, S, Uchida, K, Yamaguchi, R, Otsuka, H 1997. Clinical, morphologic, and biochemical characteristics of Chediak-Higashi syndrome in fifty-six Japanese Black cattle. American Journal of Veterinary Research 58, 12211226.Google ScholarPubMed
Pong-Wong, R, Woolliams, JA 1998. Response to mass selection when an identified major gene is segregating. Genetics, Selection, Evolution 30, 313337.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sasaki, Y, Kitagawa, H, Kitou, K, Ohkura, Y, Suzuki, K, Mizukoshi, M, Ohba, Y, Masegi, T 2002. Pathological changes of renal tubular dysplasia in Japanese Black cattle. The Veterinary Record 150, 628632.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tanida, H, Hohenboken, W 1987. Progeny testing for recessive genes: procedures and interpretations. Theoretical and Applied Genetics 75, 157164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thompson, PN, Heesterbeek, JPK, van Arendonk, JAM 2006. Changes in disease gene frequency over time with differential genotypic fitness and various control strategies. Journal of Animal Science 84, 26292635.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tu, CH, Talahashi, Y, Kaseda, Y, Uchida, K, Yamaguchi, R, Suzuki, K, Ogawa, H, Otsuka, H 1996. Inheritance of Chediak-Higashi syndrome in Japanese Black cattle. Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 58, 501504.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Van Vleck, LD 1966. Effect of artificial insemination on frequency of undesirable recessive genes. Journal of Dairy Science 50, 201204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Van Vleck, LD, Everett, RW 1976. Genetic value of sexed semen to produce dairy heifers. Journal of Dairy Science 59, 18021807.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Watanabe, D, Ban, A, Takahashi, M, Ishikawa, H, Watababe, A, Yamanobe, H, Fujimori, K, Miyake, Y, Okada, K, Otsuka, H, Oguro, M, Kawamura, S, Hirano, T, Sugimoto, Y, Abe, S, Saito, H 2002. Hereditary and clinico-pathological examinations of PCLN-1/Claudin-16 deficiency in Japanese Black cattle in the Tohoku region. Japanese Journal of Veterinary Clinics 25, 110 [in Japanese].CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wood, BJ, van der Werf, JHJ, Parnell, PE 2004. Valuing DNA marker tested bulls for commercial beef production. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 55, 825831.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 8
Total number of PDF views: 101 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 11th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Economic implications of using Japanese Black sires carrying recessive genes associated with genetic defects
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Economic implications of using Japanese Black sires carrying recessive genes associated with genetic defects
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Economic implications of using Japanese Black sires carrying recessive genes associated with genetic defects
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *