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Identification of Horse Exploitation by Clovis Hunters Based on Protein Analysis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Brian Kooyman
Affiliation:
Department of Archaeology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4
Margaret E. Newman
Affiliation:
Department of Archaeology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4
Christine Cluney
Affiliation:
Department of Archaeology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4
Murray Lobb
Affiliation:
Department of Archaeology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4
Shayne Tolman
Affiliation:
Resources and Environment, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4
Paul McNeil
Affiliation:
Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4
L. V. Hills
Affiliation:
Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4

Abstract

Positive results were obtained from protein residue analysis on three Clovis points from Wally's Beach, southwestern Alberta. Two tested positive for Equus, the third for a bovid, probably Bison or Bootherium. All genera are present in the site remains. This finding clearly demonstrates use of Equus by Clovis hunters. Four 14C dates indicate that the site was in use between 11,000 and 11,300 B.P.

Résumé

Résumé

Se han obtenido resultados positivos de un residuo proteico realizado en tres localidades Clovis en Wally's Beach, sudoeste Alberta. Dos en ellas dieron positivo para Equus, mientras que la tercera dió positivo para un bóvido, probablemente Bison o Bootherium los cuales están presentes en el sitio. Este hallazgo claramente demuestra el uso Equus por los cazadores Clovis. Las cuatros clataciones de 14C realizadas indican que elyacimiento se formó hace entre ll.000y 11,300 años A.C.

Type
Reports
Copyright
Copyright © Society for American Archaeology 2001

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