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Contents

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2021

David DeGrazia
Affiliation:
George Washington University, Washington DC
Joseph Millum
Affiliation:
National Institutes of Health, Bethesda

Summary

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This content is Open Access and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/cclicenses/

Contents

  1. List of Figures

  2. Acknowledgments

  3. 1Introduction

    1. 1.1Why This Book?

    2. 1.2Plan for the Book

  4. 2Methodology

    1. 2.1Introduction

    2. 2.2The Method of Reflective Equilibrium

    3. 2.3Alternative Methodologies

    4. 2.4Reflective Equilibrium: Clarifications and Criticisms

    5. 2.5Metaethics

  5. 3Outline of the Dual Value Theory

    1. 3.1Introduction

    2. 3.2Fundamental Values, a Formal Principle, and Scope

    3. 3.3Mid-level Principles

    4. 3.4Other Ethical Theories and Concepts

  6. 4Nonmaleficence and Negative Constraints

    1. 4.1Introduction

    2. 4.2What Is Harm?

    3. 4.3Types of Harm and Preliminary Specifications of Nonmaleficence

    4. 4.4The Right Not to Be Tortured

    5. 4.5Permissible Risks in Pediatric Research

    6. 4.6Medical Assistance-in-Dying

  7. 5Autonomy

    1. 5.1Introduction

    2. 5.2The Nature and Value of Autonomy

    3. 5.3Respect (and Disrespect) for Autonomy

    4. 5.4Justifying Interference

    5. 5.5Consent

    6. 5.6Decision-Making for Others

    7. 5.7The Right to Refuse Treatment

    8. 5.8Direct-to-Consumer Marketing of Pharmaceuticals

  8. 6Distributive Justice and Beneficence

    1. 6.1Introduction

    2. 6.2Just Institutions

    3. 6.3Individuals and the Demands of Beneficence

    4. 6.4Domestic Justice: The Right to Access Health Care

    5. 6.5Global Injustice: Intellectual Property Laws and Pharmaceuticals

  9. 7Moral Status

    1. 7.1Introduction

    2. 7.2The Concept of Moral Status

    3. 7.3A Sketch of Our Account

    4. 7.4Sentience as Necessary and Sufficient for Moral Status

    5. 7.5Clarifying the Idea of Differences in Moral Status

    6. 7.6Against Unequal Consideration

    7. 7.7Defense of a Qualified Equal-Consideration Account

    8. 7.8Embryonic Stem-Cell Research

    9. 7.9Research with Rodent Subjects

    10. 7.10Research Involving Great Apes

  10. 8Well-Being

    1. 8.1Introduction

    2. 8.2Subjective Theories

    3. 8.3Objective Theories

    4. 8.4Three Challenges for Theories of Well-Being

    5. 8.5Sketch of a Subjective Theory of Well-Being

    6. 8.6Convergence among Plausible Theories

    7. 8.7Disability in Relation to Well-Being

    8. 8.8Making Decisions for Impaired Newborns

    9. 8.9Irreversibly Unconscious Patients

  11. 9Personal Identity Theory

    1. 9.1Introduction

    2. 9.2Person-Based Accounts and Their Difficulties

    3. 9.3The Biological Account

    4. 9.4A Mind-Based Account

    5. 9.5A Social Account

    6. 9.6Our Approach to Personal Identity

    7. 9.7Personal Identity and Human Enhancement

    8. 9.8The Authority of Advance Directives in Cases of Severe Dementia

    9. 9.9The Definition and Determination of Human Death

  12. 10Creating Human Beings

    1. 10.1Introduction

    2. 10.2Procreative Autonomy

    3. 10.3Evaluating Creation

    4. 10.4Sex Selection

    5. 10.5Zika and the Nonidentity Problem

  13. Concluding Thoughts

  14. Recommended Further Readings

  15. Index

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  • Contents
  • David DeGrazia, George Washington University, Washington DC, Joseph Millum, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda
  • Book: A Theory of Bioethics
  • Online publication: 17 August 2021
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  • Contents
  • David DeGrazia, George Washington University, Washington DC, Joseph Millum, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda
  • Book: A Theory of Bioethics
  • Online publication: 17 August 2021
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

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  • Contents
  • David DeGrazia, George Washington University, Washington DC, Joseph Millum, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda
  • Book: A Theory of Bioethics
  • Online publication: 17 August 2021
Available formats
×