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Seasonality in Primates
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Book description

The emergence of the genus Homo is widely linked to the colonization of 'new' highly seasonal savannah habitats. However, until recently, our understanding of the possible impact of seasonality on this shift has been limited because we have little general knowledge of how seasonality affects the lives of primates. This book documents the extent of seasonality in food abundance in tropical woody vegetation, and then presents systematic analyses of the impact of seasonality in food supply on the behavioural ecology of non-human primates. Syntheses in this volume then produce broad generalizations concerning the impact of seasonality on behavioural ecology and reproduction in both human and non-human primates, and apply these insights to primate and human evolution. Written for graduate students and researchers in biological anthropology and behavioural ecology, this is an absorbing account of how seasonality may have affected an important episode in our own evolution.

Reviews

Review of the hardback:'In this well structured and detailed book Brockman and Schaik discuss the major role that seasonality plays in influencing the ecology and behaviour of primate species … I would highly recommend this book to anyone with an existing interest in primatology or evolutionary anthropology … All in all it offers an interesting and thought-provoking read.'

Hannah E. Parathian - University of Oxford

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Contents

  • 6 - Seasonality and long-term change in a savanna environment
    pp 157-196
    • By Susan C. Alberts, Department of Biology Duke University Box 90338 Durham NC 27708 USA; Institute for Primate Research National Museums of Kenya Nairobi Kenya, Julie A. Hollister-Smith, Department of Biology Duke University Box 90338 Durham NC 27708 USA, Raphael S. Mututua, Amboseli Baboon Research Project Amboseli National Park Kenya; Institute for Primate Research National Museums of Kenya Nairobi Kenya, Serah N. Sayialel, Amboseli Baboon Research Project Amboseli National Park Kenya; Institute for Primate Research National Museums of Kenya Nairobi Kenya, Philip M. Muruthi, African Wildlife Foundation Box 48177 Nairobi Kenya, J. Kinyua Warutere, Amboseli Baboon Research Project Amboseli National Park Kenya; Institute for Primate Research National Museums of Kenya Nairobi Kenya, Jeanne Altmann, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 USA; Department of Conservation Biology Brookfield Zoo Brookfield, IL USA; Institute for Primate Research National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya

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