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  • Print publication year: 2013
  • Online publication date: June 2013

Section 4 - Rehabilitation of specific conditions

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Further reading

DavidsJ R, RowanF, DavisR B. Indications for orthoses to improve gait in children with cerebral palsy. J Am Acad Orthop Surg 2007;15:178–88.

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