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Rapid Eye Movement Sleep
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  • Cited by 6
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Bókkon, István and Mallick, Birendra Nath 2012. Activation of Retinotopic Visual Areas Is Central to REM Sleep Associated Dreams: Visual Dreams and Visual Imagery Possibly Co-Emerged In Evolution. Activitas Nervosa Superior, Vol. 54, Issue. 1-2, p. 10.

    Desseilles, Martin and Duclos, Catherine 2013. Dream and emotion regulation: Insight from the ancient art of memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Vol. 36, Issue. 06, p. 614.

    Keller, Peggy S. Blincoe, Sarai Gilbert, Lauren R. Haak, Eric A. and DeWall, C. Nathan 2014. Sleep Deprivation and Dating Aggression Perpetration in Female College Students: The Moderating Roles of Trait Aggression, Victimization by Partner, and Alcohol Use. Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma, Vol. 23, Issue. 4, p. 351.

    Weinberg, Melissa K. Noble, Jacqueline M. and Hammond, Thomas G. 2016. Sleep well feel well: An investigation into the protective value of sleep quality on subjective well-being. Australian Journal of Psychology, Vol. 68, Issue. 2, p. 91.

    Chittora, Reena Jain, Ayushi Prasad, Jagdish and Bhatnagar, Maheep 2016. An ameliorative effect of recovery sleep on total sleep deprivation-induced neurodegeneration. Biological Rhythm Research, Vol. 47, Issue. 3, p. 425.

    Narwade, Santosh C. Mallick, Birendra N. and Deobagkar, Deepti D. 2017. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Altered Expression of Memory and Neurotransmission Associated Genes in the REM Sleep Deprived Rat Brain. Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience, Vol. 10, Issue. ,

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Book description

Spanning over half a century of investigation into Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep, this volume provides comprehensive coverage of a broad range of topics in REM sleep biology. World renowned researchers and experts are brought together to discuss past and current research and to set the foundation for future developments. Key topics are covered in six sections from fundamental topics (historical context and general biology) to cutting-edge research on neuronal regulation, neuroanatomy and neurochemistry, functional significance and disturbance in the REM sleep generating mechanism. A reference source for all aspects of REM sleep research, it also incorporates chapters on neural modelling, findings from non-human species and interactions between brain regions. This is an invaluable resource, essential reading for all involved in sleep research and clinical practice.

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Contents


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