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  • Print publication year: 2010
  • Online publication date: February 2010

Section 2 - Nutritional regulation and requirements for lactation and infant growth

References

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30. CunnaneSC, CunnaneSC, FrancescuttiV, BrennaJT, and CrawfordMA, Breast-fed infants achieve a higher rate of brain and whole body docosahexaenoate accumulation than formula-fed infants not consuming dietary docosahexaenoate. Lipids (2000), 35:105–11.
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32. CalderPC, Krauss-EtschmannS, de JongEC, DupontC, FrickJS, FrokiaerH, et al., Early nutrition and immunity – progress and perspectives. Br J Nutr (2006), 96:774–90.
33. KoletzkoB, BakerS, CleghornG, NetoUF, GopalanS, HernellO, et al., Global standard for the composition of infant formula: recommendations of an ESPGHAN coordinated international expert group. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr (2005), 41:584–99.
34. KramerMS and KakumaR, Maternal dietary antigen avoidance during pregnancy or lactation, or both, for preventing or treating atopic disease in the child. Cochrane Database Syst Rev (2006), 3:CD000133.
35. ChouraquiJP, DupontC, BocquetA, BressonJL, BriendA, DarmaunD, et al., Comité de nutrition de la Société française de pédiatrie. Feeding during the first months of life and prevention of allergy. Arch Pediatr (2008), 15:431–42.
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37. OwenCG, MartinRM, WhincupPH, SmithGD, and CookDG, Does breastfeeding influence risk of type 2 diabetes in later life? A quantitative analysis of published evidence. Am J Clin Nutr (2006), 84:1043–54.
38. OwenCG, MartinRM, WhincupPH, Davey-SmithG, GillmanMW, and CookDG, The effect of breastfeeding on mean body mass index throughout life: a quantitative review of published and unpublished observational evidence. Am J Clin Nutr (2005), 82:1298–307.
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40. World Health Organization and United Nations Children's Fund, Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding (Geneva: World Health Organization, 2003).
41. FewtrellMS, MorganJB, DugganC, GunnlaugssonG, HibberdPL, LucasA, and KleinmanRE, Optimal duration of exclusive breastfeeding: what is the evidence to support current recommendations?Am J Clin Nutr (2007), 85:635S–638S.
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43. Kris-EthertonPM and InnisS, American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada. Position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada: dietary fatty acids. J Am Diet Assoc (2007), 107:1599–611.
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45. Greer, FR, SichererSH, and BurksAW. Effects of early nutritional interventions on the development of atopic disease in infants and children: the role of maternal dietary restriction, breastfeeding, timing of introduction of complementary foods, and hydrolyzed formulas. Pediatrics (2008), 121:183–91.

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21. SaintL, MaggioreP, and HartmannPE, Yield and nutrient content of milk in eight women breast-feeding twins and one woman breast-feeding triplets. Br J Nutr (1986), 56:49–58.
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33. SandersTA and ReddyS, The influence of a vegetarian diet on the fatty acid composition of human milk and the essential fatty acid status of the infant. J Pediatr (1992), 120:S71–7.
34. InnisSM and JacobsenK, Dietary lipids in early development and intestinal inflammatory bowel disease. Nutr Rev (2007), 65:S188–93.
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36. GregoryK, Update on nutrition for preterm and full-term infants. J Obstet Gynecol Neonat Nurs (2004), 34:98–108.
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38. American Association of Pediatrics, American Association of Pediatrics policy statement: breastfeeding and the use of human milk. Pediatrics (2005), 115:496–506.
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