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  • Print publication year: 2009
  • Online publication date: January 2010

Chapter 24 - Post-acute and community rehabilitation of the head-injured patient

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Head Injury
  • Online ISBN: 9780511576515
  • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511576515
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