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  • Print publication year: 2010
  • Online publication date: November 2010

5 - Specific phobia

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Suggested readings

Professional books
AntonyMM, SwinsonRP. Phobic Disorders and Panic in Adults: A Guide to Assessment and Treatment. Washington: American Psychological Association, 2000.
CraskeMG, AntonyMM, BarlowDH. Mastering Your Fears and Phobias (Therapist Guide), 2nd edn. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.
MajM, AkiskalHS, López-IborJJ, OkashaA. Phobias. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons, 2004.
Self-help books
AntonyMM, CraskeMG, BarlowDH. Mastering Your Fears and Phobias (Client Workbook), 2nd edn. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.
AntonyMM, McCabeRE. Overcoming Animal and Insect Phobias: How to Conquer Fear of Dogs, Snakes, Rodents, Bees, Spiders, and More. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, 2005.
AntonyMM, WatlingMA. Overcoming Medical Phobias: How to Conquer Fear of Blood, Needles, Doctors, and Dentists. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, 2006.
AntonyMM, RowaK. Overcoming Fear of Heights: How to Conquer Acrophobia and Live a Life Without Limits. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, 2007.
BrownD. Flying Without Fear. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, 1996.
TriffittJ. Back in the Driver’s Seat: Understanding, Challenging, and Managing Fear of Driving. Tasmania, Australia: Dr. Jacqui Triffitt (www.backinthedriversseat.com.au), 2003.

Professional books

AntonyMM, SwinsonRP. Phobic Disorders and Panic in Adults: A Guide to Assessment and Treatment. Washington: American Psychological Association, 2000.
CraskeMG, AntonyMM, BarlowDH. Mastering Your Fears and Phobias (Therapist Guide), 2nd edn. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.
MajM, AkiskalHS, López-IborJJ, OkashaA. Phobias. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons, 2004.

Self-help books

AntonyMM, CraskeMG, BarlowDH. Mastering Your Fears and Phobias (Client Workbook), 2nd edn. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.
AntonyMM, McCabeRE. Overcoming Animal and Insect Phobias: How to Conquer Fear of Dogs, Snakes, Rodents, Bees, Spiders, and More. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, 2005.
AntonyMM, WatlingMA. Overcoming Medical Phobias: How to Conquer Fear of Blood, Needles, Doctors, and Dentists. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, 2006.
AntonyMM, RowaK. Overcoming Fear of Heights: How to Conquer Acrophobia and Live a Life Without Limits. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, 2007.
BrownD. Flying Without Fear. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, 1996.
TriffittJ. Back in the Driver’s Seat: Understanding, Challenging, and Managing Fear of Driving. Tasmania, Australia: Dr. Jacqui Triffitt (www.backinthedriversseat.com.au), 2003.

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