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  • Cited by 2
  • Print publication year: 2010
  • Online publication date: November 2010

10 - Schizophrenia and psychotic disorders

Summary

This chapter provides a combination of empirical evidence along with an emphasis on clinical skills and techniques for the treatment of social anxiety disorder. Individuals with social anxiety disorder may experience anxiety and/or avoidance of a variety of social situations, including parties, and public speaking. Although there have been a multitude of studies of the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapies and pharmacotherapies for social anxiety disorder, this chapter focuses on the combination of exposure and cognitive techniques. Social anxiety disorder is a debilitating disorder that follows a chronic course. Inclusion of a clinical case gives a flavor for the types of clients with social anxiety disorder treated in clinic, although these clients cover a wide spectrum of severity and impairment. The chapter highlights certain key areas in the treatment protocol in which the therapist makes decisions based on empirical evidence and to a great extent on their clinical skills and experience.

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Suggested readings

Books
BarrowcloughC, TarrierN.Families of Schizophrenic Patients: A Cognitive-behavioural Intervention. London: Chapman & Hall, 1992. (Reprinted in 1997; Cheltenham: Stanley Thornes.)
TarrierN. A cognitive-behavioural case formulation approach to the treatment of schizophrenia. In TarrierN, ed. Case Formulation in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy: The Treatment of Challenging and Complex Cases. London: Routledge. 2006, pp. 167–87.
TarrierN. Cognitive-behavior therapy for schizophrenia and psychotic disorders. In BarlowDH, ed. Clinical Handbook of Psychological Disorders: A Step-by-step Treatment Manual, 4th edn. New York: Guilford Press, 2007.
MorrisonAP. Cognitive behaviour therapy for psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia. In TarrierN, WellsA, HaddockG, eds. Treating Complex Cases: The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Approach. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons. 1998, pp. 195–216.
Online resources
Rethink: the National Schizophrenia Fellowshipwww.rethink.org
The National Institute of Mental Healthwww.nimh.nih.gov

Books

BarrowcloughC, TarrierN.Families of Schizophrenic Patients: A Cognitive-behavioural Intervention. London: Chapman & Hall, 1992. (Reprinted in 1997; Cheltenham: Stanley Thornes.)
TarrierN. A cognitive-behavioural case formulation approach to the treatment of schizophrenia. In TarrierN, ed. Case Formulation in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy: The Treatment of Challenging and Complex Cases. London: Routledge. 2006, pp. 167–87.
TarrierN. Cognitive-behavior therapy for schizophrenia and psychotic disorders. In BarlowDH, ed. Clinical Handbook of Psychological Disorders: A Step-by-step Treatment Manual, 4th edn. New York: Guilford Press, 2007.
MorrisonAP. Cognitive behaviour therapy for psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia. In TarrierN, WellsA, HaddockG, eds. Treating Complex Cases: The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Approach. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons. 1998, pp. 195–216.

Online resources

Rethink: the National Schizophrenia Fellowshipwww.rethink.org
The National Institute of Mental Healthwww.nimh.nih.gov

References

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