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  • Print publication year: 2014
  • Online publication date: March 2015

PART I - Concepts, theories and methods

  • Edited by Pablo P. L. Tinio, Montclair State University, New Jersey, Jeffrey K. Smith, University of Otago, New Zealand
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • pp 1-112

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