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  • The African Court of Justice and Human and Peoples' Rights in Context
  • Development and Challenges
  • Online publication date: May 2019
  • pp xi-xviii
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press

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Contributors

Editors

  • Charles C. Jalloh is a Professor of Law at Florida International University, a member of the United Nations International Law Commission where he was Chairperson of the Drafting Committee for the 70th session and Founding Director of the African Court Research Initiative (ACRI). He has published extensively in the field of international criminal law and is founding editor of the African Journal of Legal Studies and the African Journal of International Criminal Justice. Jalloh previously practised law in the Canadian Department of Justice, the Special Court for Sierra Leone, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, and as a visiting professional, in the International Criminal Court. In 2018, he received the FIU Senate Faculty Award for Excellence in Research and the Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Public International Law at Lund University, Sweden.

  • Kamari M. Clarke is a professor of Global and International Studies and the Department of Law and Legal Studies at Carleton University. She is one of the co-founders of the African Court Research Initiative (ACRI) and has published extensively on issues concerning international law, politics and social policy. She was formerly a professor at Yale University and Research Scientist at Yale Law School.

  • Vincent O. Nmehielle is Secretary-General of the African Development Bank Group; Visiting Professor of Law, University of the Witwatersrand School of Law, Johannesburg, South Africa; Former Professor of Law and Head of the Wits Programme on Law, Justice and Development in Africa, University of the Witwatersrand School of Law; Former Legal Counsel of the African Union; and Former Principal Defender of the United Nations-backed Special Court for Sierra Leone.

Contributors

  • Adejoké Babington-Ashaye is currently senior counsel at the World Bank Administrative Tribunal. She was formally an Associate Legal Officer at the International Court of Justice and an Investigator in the Office of the Prosecutor, International Criminal Court. She was also Co-Chair of the Africa Committee, American Bar Association Section of International Law and the Director of Programmes of the African Association of International Law.

  • Japhet Biegon is the Africa Regional Advocacy Coordinator at Amnesty International and holds a doctor of laws degree (LLD) in international human rights law. He previously served as the director of investigations at the Kenya Independent Policing Oversight Authority (IPOA) where he led investigations into police misconduct. Dr. Biegon is also an extra-ordinary lecturer at the Centre for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria, and is the coeditor of the seminal book, Prosecuting International Crimes in Africa, published in 2011 by the Pretoria University Law Press.

  • Netsanet Belay is the Africa Director for Research and Advocacy at Amnesty International. He was previously Director of the Policy and Research at CIVICUS World Alliance for Citizen’s Participation in Johannesburg, South Africa. He spent over two years in prison in Ethiopia as a ‘Prisoner of Conscience’ for his role in leading human rights activism in the country.

  • Edwin Bikundo is a senior lecturer at Griffith Law School, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia. He also practised as an Advocate of the High Court of Kenya and taught at the Faculty of Law at the University of Nairobi and the Faculty of Arts at Egerton University in Kenya.

  • Neil Boister is a professor at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. A revised version of his PhD thesis was published as Penal Aspects of the UN Drug Conventions (2001), described in the journal Addiction as ‘a text of magisterial authority’. In 2014, he received the Freidrich Wilhelm Bessel Prize from the Humboldt Foundation in Germany for his work in transnational criminal law.

  • Natacha Bracq is a lawyer in practice at the Paris Bar, specializing in human rights. She holds a Masters’ in Human Rights Law from the University of Paris X and a Masters’ in Public Law from the University of Le Mans. Over the last four years she has worked before various international tribunals including the International Court of Justice, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Court.

  • Adam Branch is a university lecturer in the Department of Politics and International Studies at the University of Cambridge and the director of the Cambridge Centre of African Studies. Prior to joining Cambridge, he was senior research fellow at the Makerere Institute of Social Research in Kampala.

  • Daniëlla Dam-de Jong is an assistant professor at the Department of Public International Law and the Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies at Leiden University. Her dissertation entitled International Law and Governance of Natural Resources in Conflict and Post-Conflict Situations received a research prize by the Foundation Praemium Erasmianum and an honorary mention by the Max van der Stoel Human Rights Award. The dissertation has been published as a monograph by Cambridge University (2015).

  • Margaret M. deGuzman is a professor of law at Temple University Beasley School of Law. Professor deGuzman also served as a legal advisor to the Senegal delegation at the Rome Conference where the ICC was created and as a law clerk in the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for Former Yugoslavia. She was a Fulbright Scholar in Darou N’diar, Senegal.

  • Erika de Wet is a SARChI Professor of International Constitutional Law in the Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria, South Africa and also Honorary Professor in the Faculty of Law, University of Bonn, Germany. Her work has been widely cited, including by the International Court of Justice, the International Criminal Court, the European Court of Human Rights, the South African Supreme Court of Appeal and the United Kingdom Supreme Court.

  • Mark A. Drumbl is the Class of 1975 Alumni Professor at Washington and Lee University where he currently serves as the Director of the Transnational Law Institute. He has held visiting appointments with various law faculties and his first book, Atrocity, Punishment, and International Law, has been widely reviewed and critically acclaimed. In 2012, he published Reimagining Child Soldiers (OUP).

  • Chile Eboe-Osuji is the president of the International Criminal Court where he has served as a judge since March 2012. He has also served as prosecution counsel in the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and as senior prosecution appeals counsel in the Special Court for Sierra Leone, as well as Legal Advisor to the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.

  • Stuart Ford is a professor at John Marshall Law School. He is Co-Chair of the American Society of International Law’s International Courts and Tribunals Interest Group and is a past Chair of the American Association of Law Schools’ Section on International Human Rights. He has also served as a Visiting Professional at the International Criminal Court and as an Assistant Prosecutor at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia.

  • José L. Gómez del Prado is a visiting lecturer at Universities of Barcelona, Deusto – EIUC Venice, Alicante, Madrid. He also is a member of the UN Working Group on the use of mercenaries (Member/Chair); is an expert of the UN Advisory Group of the Voluntary Fund in the First International Decade of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. Senior Officer, UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

  • Douglas Guilfoyle is an associate professor at the University of New South Wales Canberra. He was previously a professor of law at Monash University, a reader in law at University College London, and has worked as a judicial associate in the Australian Federal Court and the Australian Administrative Appeals Tribunal. He was a Gates Cambridge Trust scholar and Chevening scholar during his graduate study at the University of Cambridge.

  • John Hatchard is a barrister and Professor of Law at the Buckingham Law School. He is also a senior teaching fellow at the School of Oriental and African Studies. He has also served as Chief Mutual Legal Assistance Officer at the Commonwealth Secretariat and was a Senior Fellow at the British Institute for International and Comparative Law. He was General Secretary of the Commonwealth Legal Education Association from 1996 to 2006 and is now a Vice-President of the Association.

  • Wayne Jordash QC has acted as an advisor to the Principal Defender at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia and has provided specialist advice to Human Rights Watch on qualified privilege for human rights workers, the Ugandan judiciary on the legality of amnesties in international law, and the International Commission of Jurists on the prospects of prosecuting a sitting head of state for international crimes.

  • Joanna Kyriakakis is a senior lecturer in the Law Faculty and a deputy director of the Castan Centre for Human Rights Law at Monash University. She has held visiting fellowships at Columbia University and the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law. Dr. Kyriakakis has also worked with the South Australian Crown Solicitor’s Office and in private and community legal practice.

  • Pacifique Manirakiza is an associate professor at the Faculty of Law (Common Law Section), University of Ottawa. He was also a member of the African Commission on Human and People’s Rights and was appointed member of the African Union-led Commission of Inquiry on South Sudan. Previously he served as Assistant Professor at University of Burundi and Deputy Prosecutor in Ngozi and Rudana Provinces.

  • Rob McLaughlin is a professor at the University of New South Wales Canberra and Director of the Australian Centre for the Study of Armed Conflict and Society. McLaughlin previously held a career in the Royal Australian Navy as a Seaman officer and a Legal officer. His legal roles included as the Fleet Legal Officer, the Strategic Legal Adviser, as a Counsel Assisting the HMAS SYDNEY II Commission of Inquiry, Director Operations and International Law, and Director Naval Legal Service. He has also been an associate professor of law at the Australian National University.

  • Tim Murithi heads the Justice and Peacebuilding Programme at the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also Extraordinary Professor of African Studies, at the Centre for African Studies, University of Free State, South Africa. He has held posts at the Department of Peace Studies, University of Bradford, the United Kingdom; Institute for Security Studies, in Addis Ababa; and the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR), in Geneva, Switzerland. He has also served as an Adviser to the African Union and UNDP.

  • Rachel Murray is a professor of International Human Rights Law at the University of Bristol where she is also Director of its Human Rights Implementation Centre. She is on the board of the Institute for Human Rights and Development in Africa, and is a Fellow of the Human Rights Centre at the University of Essex and a member of Doughty Street Chambers.

  • Godfrey M. Musila is a research fellow at the Africa Center for Strategic Studies in the National Defence University. Dr. Musila was previously Head of Research at the International Nuremberg Principles Academy in Germany. He was principal author of the report of the African Union Commission of Inquiry on South Sudan and currently serves as volunteer on the Human Rights Council’s Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan.

  • Daniel D. Ntanda Nsereko is a member of the Advisory Committee on nominations of judges of the International Criminal Court and was previously a Judge of the International Criminal Court (2008–2012), and served as a Trial Observer to Swaziland (1990) and to Ethiopia (1996). He was appointed as an Appeals Judge at the ICC in 2007.

  • Tom Obokata is a professor of International Law and Human Rights at Keele University. Previously he taught at Queen’s University Belfast (2006–2012) and University of Dundee (2004–2006). Prior to commencing his PhD degree, Professor Obokata worked for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Regional Office of Japan and the Republic of Korea (1999–2000).

  • Cecily Rose is an assistant professor of International Law at the Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies, Leiden Law School, and a senior editor of the Leiden Journal of International Law. She previously worked as an associate legal officer at the International Court of Justice in The Hague, and at the Special Court for Sierra Leone in Freetown, Sierra Leone.

  • Ben Saul is Challis Chair of International Law at the University of Sydney and an Associate Fellow of Chatham House (the Royal Institute of International Affairs) in London. Saul practices as a barrister in international, regional and national courts, including the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, Special Tribunal for Lebanon, Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights.

  • Sergey Sayapin is an assistant professor at KIMEP School of Law. In 2000–2014, he held several posts at the Regional Delegation of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in Central Asia. Dr. Sayapin is a member of the Asian Association of International Law and of the Council of Advisors of the Global Institute for the Prevention of Aggression.

  • Matiangai Sirleaf is an Assistant Professor of Law at the University Pittsburgh Law School. She previously served as an assistant professor of law at the University of Baltimore School of Law, as a Sharswood Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, and as a lecturer for the International Human Rights Exchange Programme run by Bard College and University of the Witwatersrand. Her work focuses on remedying the accountability and responsibility gaps that exist in international law. From 2010 to 2012, Sirleaf worked in private practice with Cohen, Milstein, Sellers & Toll in Washington, D.C., where she represented plaintiffs in numerous international human rights cases litigated in federal courts. Prior to that, she served as a law clerk to Chief Justice Sandile Ngcobo of the Constitutional Court of South Africa and worked at the International Center for Transitional Justice. She received her JD from Yale Law School in 2008 and her MA from the University of Ghana (Legon) in International Affairs in 2005. In 2014, she received the Martin Luther King Jr. Humanitarian Award from New York University.

  • James G. Stewart is an associate professor at the Peter A. Allard School of Law, the University of British Columbia. Previously he was an Appeals Counsel with the Prosecution of the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. He also worked for the Legal Division of the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Prosecution of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. Presently, he serves as a Senior Legal Advisor to judges of the Appeals Chamber of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia.

  • Melinda Taylor is a defence counsel before the International Criminal Court, where she has been lead counsel in the Bemba Article 70 Case. She was for a longtime the Counsel in the Office of the Public Counsel for the Defence and has extensive experience in the field of international criminal law.

  • Dire Tladi is Professor of International Law in the Department of Public Law, and a Fellow at the Institute of Comparative and International Law in Africa at the University of Pretoria. He is a member of the United Nations International Law Commission, the Institut du Droit International and the ILC’s Special Rapporteur on Peremptory Norms of General International Law (Jus Cogens). From 2009 to 2013 he served as legal advisor to the South African Permanent Mission to the United Nations.

  • Hannibal Travis is a professor of law at Florida International University College of Law. He is currently an editorial advisory board member of Genocide Studies International (University of Toronto Press). He joined FIU after several years practising law. He is the author of Genocide, Ethnonationalism, and the United Nations: Exploring the Causes of Mass Killing Since 1945 (Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2012).

  • Harmen van der Wilt is a professor of International Criminal Law at the Amsterdam School of Law, University of Amsterdam. He is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of International Criminal Justice, the Netherlands Yearbook of International Law and the major Dutch journal on criminal law, Delikt en Delinkwent. Van der Wilt has been an ad litem Judge in the Criminal Court of Roermond and is currently an ad litem judge in the Extradition Chamber of the District Court in Amsterdam.

  • Manuel J. Ventura is an Associate Legal Officer, Chambers, Special Tribunal for Lebanon; Director of The Peace and Justice Initiative, and Adjunct Fellow, School of Law, Western Sydney University.

  • George Mukundi Wachira is Founding head of the African Governance Architecture (AGA) Secretariat, Department of Political Affairs, African Union (AU) Commission (2012–16). Currently Dr Wachira is the Chief Executive Officer of Maendeleo Group which is a legal advisory and management consulting firm incorporated to harness global human resource talent for sustainable development in Africa. Wachira holds a Doctor of Laws (LLD) Degree in International Human Rights Law from the University of Pretoria and a Master in Public Administration Degree (MPA) from the Harvard, Kennedy School of Government. He is an advocate of the High Court of Kenya.

  • Sara Wharton is an assistant professor at the University of Windsor. Previously, Dr. Wharton was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the National University of Singapore and a Visiting Fellow at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia where she held an Endeavour Research Fellowship (Government of Australia).