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  • Print publication year: 2009
  • Online publication date: October 2009

SECTION I - Pain Physiology and Pharmacology

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42. Bessler H, Shavit Y, Mayburd E, Smirnov G, Beilin B. Postoperative pain, morphine consumption, and genetic polymorphism of IL-1beta and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Neurosci Lett. 2006;404(1–2):154–158.
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51. Sivilotti LG, Thompson SW, Woolf CJ. Rate of rise of the cumulative depolarization evoked by repetitive stimulation of small-caliber afferents is a predictor of action potential windup in rat spinal neurons in vitro. J Neurophysiol. 1993;69(5):1621–1631.
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61. Sonohata M, Furue H, Katafuchi T, et al. Actions of noradrenaline on substantia gelatinosa neurones in the rat spinal cord revealed by in vivo patch recording. J Physiol. 2004;555(2):515–526.
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64. Peyron R, Laurent B, Garcia-Larrea L. Functional imaging of brain responses to pain: a review and meta-analysis. Clin Neurophysiol. 2000;30(5):263–288.
65. Coghill RC, Sang CN, Berman KF, Bennett GJ, Iadarola MJ. Global cerebral blood flow decreases during pain. J Cerebral Blood Flow Metab. 1998;18(2):141–147.
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73. Besson JM. The neurobiology of pain. Lancet. 1999;353(9164):1610–1615.
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76. Zeilhofer HU. Synaptic modulation in pain pathways. Rev Physiol Biochem Pharmacol. 2005;154:73–100.
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83. Ji RR, Baba H, Brenner GJ, Woolf CJ. Nociceptive-specific activation of ERK in spinal neurons contributes to pain hypersensitivity. Nat Neurosci. 1999;2(12):1114–1119.
84. Fang L, Wu J, Lin Q, Willis WD. Calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II contributes to spinal cord central sensitization. J Neurosci. 2002;22(10):4196–4204.
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