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Chapter 11 - Periviability

from Section 3 - Professionally Responsible Clinical Practice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 November 2019

Laurence B. McCullough
Affiliation:
Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell
John H. Coverdale
Affiliation:
Baylor College of Medicine, Texas
Frank A. Chervenak
Affiliation:
Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell
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Summary

This chapter provides an ethical framework to guide decision making about periviable birth.

Viability in professional ethics in obstetrics and gynecology is a function of both fetal physiology and available resuscitation and life-sustaining treatment. Viability is therefore the biological capacity of a live-born infant to survive even if full technological support is needed. This is the concept of viability used by the United States Supreme Court in its landmark ruling, Roe v. Wade, in 1973.

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Chapter
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

Chervenak, FA, McCullough, LB, Levene, MI. An ethically justified, clinically comprehensive approach to peri-viability: gynaecological, obstetric, perinatal, and neonatal dimensions. J Obstet Gynaecol 2007; 21: 37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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World Health Organization. 1950 definition of live birth. Available at www.gfmer.ch/Medical_education_En/Live_birth_definition.htm (accessed March 1, 2019).
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American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. Ecker, JL, Kaimal, A, Mercer, BM, Blackwell, SC, et al. Obstetric Care Consensus. #6 Periviable Birth. Obstet Gynecol 2017; 130: e187e198.Google Scholar
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