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Chapter 11 - Vulvo-Vaginal Atrophy (VVA)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 June 2020

Nicholas Panay
Affiliation:
Queen Charlotte's & Chelsea Hospital, London
Paula Briggs
Affiliation:
Liverpool Women's NHS Foundation Trust
Gabor T. Kovacs
Affiliation:
Monash University, Victoria
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Summary

The term vulvo-vaginal atrophy (VVA) defines the anatomic and physiological changes in the vulvo-vaginal tissues, which are directly related to reduced circulating estrogen levels, associated with menopause and aging. Atrophic vaginitis connotes a state of inflammation or infection that may be present in some women with VVA.

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Chapter
Information
Managing the Menopause , pp. 105 - 111
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

Sturdee, DW, Panay, N, International Menopause Society Writing Group.Recommendations for the management of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy. Climacteric 2010;13:509–22.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Portman, DJ, Gass, ML, Vulvovaginal Atrophy Terminology Consensus Conference Panel. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause: new terminology for vulvovaginal atrophy from the International Society for the Study of Women’s Sexual Health and the North American Menopause Society. Menopause 2014;21:1063–8.Google Scholar
Palacios, S, Castelo-Branco, C, Currie, H, et al. Update on management of genitourinary syndrome of menopause: a practical guide. Maturitas 2015;82:308–13.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Simon, JA, Davis, SR, Althof, SE, et al. Sexual well-being after menopause: an International Menopause Society white paper. Climacteric 2018;21:415–27.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shifren, JL. Genito-urinary syndrome of menopause. Clin Obstet Gynecol 2018;61:508–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nappi, RE, Martini, E, Cucinella, L, et al. Addressing vulvovaginal atrophy (vva)/genitourinary syndrome of menopause (gsm) for healthy aging in women. Front Endocrinol 2019;10:561.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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