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Chapter 19 - Androgen Therapy for Postmenopausal Women

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 June 2020

Nicholas Panay
Affiliation:
Queen Charlotte's & Chelsea Hospital, London
Paula Briggs
Affiliation:
Liverpool Women's NHS Foundation Trust
Gabor T. Kovacs
Affiliation:
Monash University, Victoria
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Summary

Traditionally, the term androgens refers to a group of 19 carbon steroid hormones that are associated with maleness and the induction of male secondary sexual characteristics. This is as outdated as the concept of estrogen being only a female hormone. The major androgens circulate in concentrations greater than those of the estrogens in healthy women and androgens have a critical role in female physiology.

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Chapter
Information
Managing the Menopause , pp. 187 - 193
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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