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Good Language Teachers: Past, Present, and Future Directions

from Part III - Instructional Perspectives

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 April 2020

Carol Griffiths
Affiliation:
University of Leeds
Zia Tajeddin
Affiliation:
Tarbiat Modares University, Iran
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Summary

Teachers have always been among the main stakeholders in language education. A review of the fads and fashions and the rise and fall of language teaching methods testifies to the varied roles assigned to language teachers. In the heyday of the methods era, ranging from the audiolingual method to Task-Based Language Teaching (TBLT), teachers constantly received attention depending on how teacher roles were defined in each method. These roles are well presented in two seminal volumes by Richards and Rodgers (2001) and Larsen-Freeman (2000).

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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