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12 - English and Spanish in Contact in North America

US Latino Communities and the Emergence of Transnational Mediascapes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 September 2021

Danae Perez
Affiliation:
University of Zurich
Marianne Hundt
Affiliation:
University of Zurich
Johannes Kabatek
Affiliation:
University of Zurich
Daniel Schreier
Affiliation:
University of Zurich
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Summary

This chapter analyses language contact between English and Spanish in the United States in terms of de Swaan’s (2002) World Language System, which explains – among other things – why US Spanish, a variety that is regarded as low-prestige on the US national level and among many Hispanophone traditionalists, has nevertheless become influential and attractive throughout the Spanish-speaking world. Inspired by Appadurai’s (1996) model of cultural globalisation, the concept of languagescapes is introduced to account for the dynamics of Spanish-English language mixing across a wide range of spoken and written domains. Spanish-English code-switching has already been studied extensively in conversational data. Where the chapter breaks new ground is in exploring the specific features of code-switching performances in literature and in computer-mediated communication, which have to be seen both in the context of sociolinguistic community norms in the United States and against the background of a global linguistic ecology in which both Spanish and English occupy very important positions.

Type
Chapter
Information
English and Spanish
World Languages in Interaction
, pp. 233 - 257
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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