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Insights into soy lecithin and egg yolk-based extenders for chilling canine spermatozoa

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2018

Andressa Dalmazzo
Affiliation:
University of São Paulo, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Department of Animal Reproduction, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, Brazil
Daniel de Souza Ramos Angrimani
Affiliation:
University of São Paulo, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Department of Animal Reproduction, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, Brazil
João Diego A. Losano*
Affiliation:
University of São Paulo, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Department of Animal Reproduction, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, Brazil
Carolina C. Rocha
Affiliation:
University of São Paulo, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Department of Animal Reproduction, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, Brazil
Carlos A. B. Sobrinho
Affiliation:
University of São Paulo, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Department of Animal Reproduction, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, Brazil
João Rafael Chinait Gurgel
Affiliation:
University of São Paulo, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Department of Animal Reproduction, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, Brazil
Pedro Ivo Monteiro Pacheco
Affiliation:
University of São Paulo, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Department of Animal Reproduction, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, Brazil
Claudia Kiyomi Minazaki
Affiliation:
University of São Paulo, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Department of Animal Reproduction, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, Brazil
Silvia E. Crusco
Affiliation:
University of São Paulo, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Department of Animal Reproduction, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, Brazil
Marcilio Nichi
Affiliation:
University of São Paulo, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Department of Animal Reproduction, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, Brazil
Valquíria H. Barnabe
Affiliation:
University of São Paulo, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Department of Animal Reproduction, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, Brazil
*
Address for correspondence: João Diego A. Losano. University of São Paulo, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Department of Animal Reproduction, Av. Prof. Dr. Orlando Marques de Paiva, n. 87, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, SP, CEP 05508–270, Brazil. E-mail: jdalosano@usp.br

Summary

The aim of this study was to compare different concentrations of soy lecithin (LEC0.01%, LEC0.05% and LEC0.1%) with egg yolk (Control) in cooling extenders during the storage of semen at 5ºC for 5 days. Twelve dogs (n = 12) were selected, and semen was cooled and assessed after 2, 24, 48, 72, 96 or 120 h. At each time point, sperm were analyzed for kinetic patterns (using computer-assisted sperm analysis), mitochondrial activity (3′3- diaminobenzidine assay), lipid peroxidation (TBARS assay), DNA fragmentation (SCSA®) and plasma and acrosome membrane integrity (eosin/nigrosin and fast green/rose Bengal stains, respectively). The Control group (1814.4 ± 197.2) presented the highest rates of lipid peroxidation at 120 h. Conversely, progressive motility (42.8 ± 4%), linearity (45.4 ± 1%), and VAP (88 ± 3%) were higher in the Control group. In addition, there was lower mitochondrial activity in the Control group at 72 h. Therefore, our data show that lecithin used at these concentrations was not able to maintain sperm viability at as high qualities as would egg yolk. Moreover, the decrease in high mitochondrial activity and the persistence of sperm motility may indicate a compensatory mechanism in canine spermatozoa (i.e., glycolytic pathway). Furthermore, these higher lipid peroxidation indexes could indicate the necessity for future therapy using extenders and antioxidants over a long cooling time for dog sperm.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2018 

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