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First polar body morphology affects potential development of porcine parthenogenetic embryo in vitro

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 July 2014

Junhe Hu*
Affiliation:
Department of Life Sciences, Hunan University of Humanities, Science and Technology (HUHST), Loudi City, Hunan Province, 417000, China
Chenzhong Jin
Affiliation:
Department of Life Sciences, Hunan University of Humanities, Science and Technology (HUHST), Loudi City, Hunan 417000, P.R. China.
Hui Zheng
Affiliation:
Xiangya Medical School, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410078, P.R. China.
Qinyan Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Life Sciences, Hunan University of Humanities, Science and Technology (HUHST), Loudi City, Hunan 417000, P.R. China.
Wenbing Zhu
Affiliation:
Xiangya Medical School, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410078, P.R. China.
Zhi Zeng
Affiliation:
Department of Life Sciences, Hunan University of Humanities, Science and Technology (HUHST), Loudi City, Hunan 417000, P.R. China.
Juan Wu
Affiliation:
Department of Life Sciences, Hunan University of Humanities, Science and Technology (HUHST), Loudi City, Hunan 417000, P.R. China.
Yang Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Life Sciences, Hunan University of Humanities, Science and Technology (HUHST), Loudi City, Hunan 417000, P.R. China.
Jie Li
Affiliation:
Xiangya Medical School, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410078, P.R. China.
Xuejiao Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Life Sciences, Hunan University of Humanities, Science and Technology (HUHST), Loudi City, Hunan 417000, P.R. China.
Xianglin Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Life Sciences, Hunan University of Humanities, Science and Technology (HUHST), Loudi City, Hunan 417000, P.R. China.
Jian Zhao
Affiliation:
Department of Life Sciences, Hunan University of Humanities, Science and Technology (HUHST), Loudi City, Hunan 417000, P.R. China.
*
All correspondence to: Junhe Hu. Department of Life Sciences, Hunan University of Humanities, Science and Technology (HUHST), Loudi City, Hunan Province, 417000, China. Tel:+ 86 0738 8372053. Fax: +86 0738 8372053. e-mail address: junhe_hu@126.com

Summary

Previous studies have reported that the first polar body (PB1) morphology reflects embryo development competence, but the effects of PB1 on porcine embryo development remain unknown. This study aims to determine whether the ability of porcine embryo development is related to oocytes’ PB1 in vitro. The distribution of type II cortical granules (CGs) of porcine matured oocytes in grade B PB1 is significantly greater compared with those in grades A and C PB1 (71.43% versus 52.46% and 50%; P < 0.05). The ratio of porcine parthenogenetic blastocysts and the mean cell number in each blastocyst in the group with grade B PB1 is significantly greater than that with grades A and C PB1 (30.81% vs. 19.02% and 15.15%; P < 0.05) and (36.67 versus 24.67, 28.67; P < 0.05), and no significant differences are found in the embryo cleavage for all groups (79.75%, 84.30%, and 78.18% in grades A, B, and C PB1; P > 0.05). The acetylation level of porcine embryos in the group with grade B PB1 is significantly greater compared with those in the other groups (P < 0.05), and is almost 2.5 times higher than that in grade A. Therefore, porcine oocytes with PB1 in grade B are more competitive in cytoplasmic maturation and further embryo development in vitro.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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References

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