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Article contents

Effect of oocyte-secreted factors on porcine in vitro maturation, cumulus expansion and developmental competence of parthenotes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 July 2011

Ma. Ninia L. Gomez
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
Jung Taek Kang
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
Ok Jae Koo
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
Su Jin Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
Dae Kee Kwon
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
Sol Ji Park
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
Mohammad Atikuzzaman
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
So Gun Hong
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
Goo Jang
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
Byeong Chun Lee*
Affiliation:
Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151–742, Korea.
*Corresponding
All correspondence to: Byeong Chun Lee. Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151–742, Korea. Tel: +822 880 1269. Fax: +822 873 1269. E-mail: bclee@snu.ac.kr

Summary

The oocyte is known from recent studies in the mouse, cow, sheep and human to be a central regulator of follicular cell function. However, in the pig, little information is known about the regulation of cumulus expansion by oocyte-secreted factors and oocyte quality. We investigated the possible effects of oocyte-secreted factors during in vitro maturation on cumulus expansion and on porcine oocytes as judged by subsequent embryonic development after parthenogenetic activation. Cumulus–oocyte complexes (COC) from antral follicles of pig ovaries collected from a local abattoir were divided into control and treatment groups and were cultured in tissue culture medium 199 supplemented with follicle-stimulating hormone. Treatment groups consisted of increasing numbers of denuded oocytes (DO) co-cultured with COC (at ratios of COC to DO of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:4 and 1:5). After incubation for 44 h, cumulus expansion and maturation rates were assessed and oocytes were activated parthenogenetically. Cumulus expansion in the 1 COC:4 DO and 1 COC:5 DO groups was low and altered because full dispersion of the outer layer did not occur. Cell viability was not affected, as measured by the automated cell counter, but scanning electron microscopy revealed only a scanty extracellular matrix. Blastocyst rate was significantly higher in the 1 COC:4 DO (34.4%) and in the 1 COC:5 DO (34.9%) groups (p < 0.05) when compared with other groups. Maturation rate, cleavage rate and total cell number showed no significant difference between control and treatment groups. Amplification by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed up-regulation of growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) in the cumulus cells in the 1 COC:4 DO group at 44 h. We conclude that denuded porcine oocytes could improve the maturation of COC as evidenced by increased blastocyst development in the 1 COC:4 DO, even though cumulus expansion was poor. This improvement could be a result of the GDF9 up-regulation.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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Effect of oocyte-secreted factors on porcine in vitro maturation, cumulus expansion and developmental competence of parthenotes
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