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Effect of high fat diet on artificial oocyte activation following superovulation in mice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 June 2015

Daisuke Yamamoto
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Health Science, University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan.
Toshiyuki Yasui*
Affiliation:
Department of Reproductive Technology, Institute of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan.
Chika Kobayashi
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan.
Takane Kitazato
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan.
Takeshi Iwasa
Affiliation:
School of Health Sciences, University of Tokushima, 3-18-15 Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan.
Minoru Irahara
Affiliation:
School of Health Sciences, University of Tokushima, 3-18-15 Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan.
*
All correspondence to: Toshiyuki Yasui. Department of Reproductive Technology, Institute of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan. Tel: +81 88 633 9023. Fax: +81 88 631 2630. E-mail: tosyasui@tokushima-u.ac.jp

Summary

The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of increased dietary intake and high fat diet (HFD) in mice on artificial oocyte activation by using puromycin or roscovitine. Six-week-old mice were fed as either a control diet group, an increased dietary intake group or an HFD group for 4 weeks. Oocytes were obtained following superovulation and were divided into three treatment groups (no activation treatment, calcium ionophore and puromycin treatment, and calcium ionophore and roscovitine treatment) and were incubated for 4 h. Retrieved oocytes and numbers of oocytes activated as assessed by morphological changes were compared among the three treatment groups. The proportion of degenerated oocytes in HFD mice was significantly higher than that in control diet mice. The rates of activation in oocytes treated with roscovitine were 90.3% in control diet mice, 89.8% in increased dietary intake mice and 67.9% in HFD mice. The rate of activation in oocytes treated with roscovitine in HFD mice was significantly lower than the rates in control diet mice and increased dietary intake mice. The rates of activation in oocytes treated with puromycin were 90.6% in control diet mice, 94.0% in increased dietary intake mice and 71.4% in HFD mice, and the rate of activation in oocytes treated with puromycin in HFD mice was significantly lower than the rates in control diet mice and increased dietary intake mice. HFD-induced obesity deteriorated induction of oocyte activation by roscovitine or puromycin in mice.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

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References

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