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Seeing Allende Through the Myths

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 September 2018

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Extract

Chile since the September 11 coup is a study in contrasts. There is the striking difference between the tensions and polarization of the last months of the Allende regime and the apparent calm and renewed sense of purpose of Chile under military rule. There is the contrast between the return to normalcy during the daytime and the repressive and chilling atmosphere during the nighttime curfew hours, when shots ring out periodically, helicopters fly overhead and armored cars patrol streets where only the occasional stray dog is moving freely.

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Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs 1974

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References

page 19 note • Cf. James F. Conway, “Cuba, After Chile's Bloody Fall,” Worldview(February, 1974); Luis Gonzalez Cordoba, “The Scene From Within the Moncda,” IDOC(December, 1973); Beatriz Allende, “The Day They Killed My Father,” Ms.(January, 1974).

page 19 note •• Cf. Michael Harrington, “What U.S. Role in the Chilean Coup?” Current(January, 1974), reprinted from Newsletter of the Democratic Left(October, 1973); and Paul Sigmund's response to this argument in “The ‘Invisible Blockade’ and the Overthrow of Allende,” Foreign Affairs(January, 1974); Joseph Collins, “Chile Suffered Invisible Blockade,'” National Catholic Reporter(October 12, 1973); Gabriel Garcia Marquez, “The Death of Salvador Allende,” Harpers(March, 1974).

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