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Common Cause?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 September 2018

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Extract

Dominating the lobby of Common Cause's very modern and very busy offices on M Street in Washington is a cork bulletin board nine feet high and six feet wide. Bold red letters proclaim news! Littering the board are newspaper clippings from all over the country, each bearing a red pencil stripe beneath the phrase “Common Cause.” Every working day over a thousand checks pour into this office, none of them tax-deductible. Membership in the organization has grown to 230,000 since its founding in 1970, and its membership renewal rate increased from a healthy 65 per cent in 1970 to a phenomenal 85 per cent in 1973. What sort of organization is this, and what can it tell us about our society and the individual's role in it?

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs 1974

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References

page 35 Note • There have been two exceptions to this rule: end-thewar legislation and the ban on the SST. These were probably in response to overwhelming membership interest, and out of obligation to other lobbies with whom C.C..usually combines. There is a 10-15 per cent overlap between C.C.'s members and the membership of environmental groups.

page 37 Note • If this sentence is boiled down to its essentials it reads: Because order provides order most Americans seek order.

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