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Nitrogen: some practical solutions for the poultry industry 1

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2007

Brian J. Chambers
Affiliation:
ADAS Gleadthorpe Research Centre, Meden Vale, Mansfield, Notts NG20 9PF, UK
Ken Smith
Affiliation:
ADAS Gleadthorpe Research Centre, Meden Vale, Mansfield, Notts NG20 9PF, UK
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Abstract

Over four million tonnes of poultry manure are produced annually in the UK, containing about 100 000 tonnes of nitrogen (N). During the housing, storage and land spreading of poultry manures, ammonia N losses have been estimated at 44 000 tonnes per annum, equivalent to about 19 % of estimated UK ammonia emissions in 1996. Poultry manure applications to agricultural land should supply no more than 250 kg total N/ha per annum to comply with recommendations in the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food Water Code and proposed manure loading rates in designated Nitrate Vulnerable Zones in England and Wales. To recycle the annual manure N output from 1000 layers and 1000 broiler places requires 2.6 and 2.0 hectares of land, respectively. To make best use of the readily available N content of poultry manures, applications should be made when there is a crop requirement (generally spring and summer) and should be managed as part of an integrated fertilizer N programme.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1998

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References

Chambers, B.J., Lord, E.I., Nicholson, F.A. and Smith, K.A. (1998) Predicting nitrogen availability and losses following land application of manures. Proceedings of International Workshop on Environmentally Friendly Management of Animal Farm Waste, Sopporo, Japan (Matsunaka, T., ed) pp. 145149Google Scholar
Chambers, B.J., Smith, K.A. and Van Der Weerden, T.J. (1997) Ammonia emissions following the land spreading of solid manures. In: Gaseous Nitrogen Emissions from Grassland (Jarvis, S.C. and Pain, B.F., Eds), CAB International, pp. 275280Google Scholar
DETR/MAFF/WO (1997) Draft regulations establishing the action programme measures to apply inNitrate Vulnerable Zones in England and Wales – Consultation Document. EC Nitrate Directive (91/676/EEC). Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Welsh Office, December 1997Google Scholar
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MAFF/DOE/WO (1994) Designation of Vulneruble Zones in England and Wales under the EC Nitrate Directive (91/676). MAFF Publications, London (PB 1715)Google Scholar
Pain, B.F., Misselbrook, T.H., Jarvis, S.C., Chambers, B.J., Smith, K.A., Phillips, V.R., Sneath, R.W. and Demmers, T.G.M. (1997) Inventory of Ammonia Emissions from UK Agriculture. MAFF Contract Report WA0630Google Scholar
Smith, K.A., and Chambers, B.J. (1993) Utilising the nitrogen content of organic manures – some practical solutions to farm problems. Soil Use and Management 9: 105112CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, K.A., Chambers, B.J. and Jackson, D.R. (1994) Solid manures and animal waste slurries as a source of nitrogen in arable crop rotations. In: Solid and Liquid Wastes – Their Best Destination II. Proceedings of III Congress International de Quimica de la Anque, Puerto de la CmzTenerifeDecember 1994, Volume II, pp. 285294Google Scholar

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