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Induced moulting issues and alternative dietary strategies for the egg industry in the United States

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2007

S.Y. Park
Affiliation:
Department of Poultry Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 77843
W.K. Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Poultry Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 77843
S.G. Birkhold
Affiliation:
Department of Poultry Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 77843
L.F. Kubena
Affiliation:
USDA-ARS, Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center, Food and Feed Safety Research Unit, College Station, TX, 77845, USA
D.J. Nisbet
Affiliation:
USDA-ARS, Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center, Food and Feed Safety Research Unit, College Station, TX, 77845, USA
S.C. Ricke*
Affiliation:
Department of Poultry Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 77843
*
*Corresponding author: e-mail: sricke@poultry.tamu.edu
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Abstract

The United States (U.S.) poultry industry continues to implement induced moulting to extend egg production in commercial laying flocks. Achieving an optimal moult requires dietary manipulation to cause a complete regression of the reproductive organs and cessation of egg production. This is followed by rejuvenation and initiation of an additional egg laying cycle. Currently feed withdrawal is the primary means to initiate moult and is regarded as an optimal approach for achieving post-moult performance. However, removal of feed can lead to potential physiological stress in laying hens as well as an increased susceptibility to Salmonella enteritidis colonization and invasion. To retain the ecological benefits of induced moult will require development, testing and implementation of alternative dietary approaches that minimizes these problems and increase the egg production and egg quality benefits associated with the additional egg laying cycles. Strategies for accomplishing this are discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2004

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