Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-cnwzk Total loading time: 0.216 Render date: 2021-07-31T16:32:18.922Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Antiviral and immune boosting activities of different medicinal plants against Newcastle disease virus in poultry

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 September 2015

A. RAZA
Affiliation:
Industrial Biotechnology Division, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), Faisalabad, Pakistan
F. MUHAMMAD
Affiliation:
Institute of Pharmacy, Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan
S. BASHIR
Affiliation:
Industrial Biotechnology Division, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), Faisalabad, Pakistan
M.I. ANWAR
Affiliation:
Office of the Deputy District Livestock Officer, Poultry Production, Faisalabad, Pakistan
M.M. AWAIS
Affiliation:
Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan, Pakistan
M. AKHTAR
Affiliation:
Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan, Pakistan
B. ASLAM
Affiliation:
Institute of Pharmacy, Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan
T. KHALIQ
Affiliation:
Institute of Pharmacy, Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan
M.U. NASEER
Affiliation:
Department of Parasitology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Get access

Abstract

The poultry industry is affected by economically important problems such as Newcastle disease (ND). Newcastle disease virus (NDV) belongs to the Paramyxoviridae family and manifests as different strains; lentogenic, mesogenic and velogenic. ND affects the quality of eggs and impairs growth performance of birds. Various efforts have been made to control economic losses due to this disease, including using live and killed vaccines, which do not confer 100% immunity in all cases. Due to mutations within viral strains, NDV can become resistant and difficult to control, and there is a need to search for alternative measures. Medicinal plants are considered as a complementary means to control this virus, especially in developing countries, because they have been implicated in treatments for a variety of infectious and non-infectious diseases. Alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins and tannins found in plants have been regarded as novel antiviral agents. The following paper encompasses the studies related to plants having in vitro antiviral activity against ND such as Momordica balamina, Adansonia digitata, Artemisia annua, Azadirachta indica, Psidium guajava, Moringa oleifera and plants having good in vivo antiviral activity such as Aloe secundiflora, Cucumis metuliferus and Anthocleista nobilis as well. It discusses plants with the potential to improve the immunity of infected birds, such as Mangrove halophytes, Nigella sativa, Polysavone, Melissa officinalis, Momordica cochinchinensis, Echinacea purpurea, Withania somnifera and Aspargus Racemosus.

Type
Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © World's Poultry Science Association 2015 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

ABD-ALLA, H.I., SHAABAN, M., SHAABAN, K.A., ABU-GABAL, N.S., SHALABY, N.M. and LAATSCH, H. (2009) New bioactive compounds from Aloe hijazensis. Natural Product Research23: 1035-1049.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
ABD-ALLA, H.I., ABU-GABAL, N.S., HASSAN, A.Z., EL-SAFTY, M.M. and SHALABY, N.M. (2012) Antiviral activity of Aloe hijazensis against some haemagglutinating viruses infection and its phytoconstituents. Archive Pharmacology Research 35: 1347-1354.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
AKINIYI, J.A., SULTANBAWA, M.U.A. and MNAWAKU, D. (1986) Ethnobotany and ethnopharmacology of Nigerian medicinal plants, in: The State of Medicinal Plant Research in Nigeria, pp. 154-165 (University Press, Ibadan, Nigeria).Google Scholar
ALEXANDER, D.J. and SENNE, D.A. (2008) Newcastle disease and other avian paramyxoviruses, in: DUFOUR-ZAVALA, L., SENNE, D.A. & GLISSON, J.R. (Eds) A laboratory manual for the isolation, identification and characterization of avian pathogens, 5th Ed ) pp. 135-141 (OmniPress, Inc, Madison, Wisconsin, USA).Google Scholar
ALVES, D.S., PÉREZ-FONS, L., ESTEPA, A. and MICOL, V. (2004) Membrane-related effects underlying the biological activity of the anthraquinones emodin and barbaloin. Biochemical Pharmacology 68: 549-561.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
AYODELE, P.O., OKONKO, I.O., ODU, N.N. and BANSO, A. (2012) Antiviral effect of Anthocleista nobilis root extract on the biochemical indices of poultry fowls infected with newcastle disease virus (NDV). Annals of Biological Research 3: 20-30.Google Scholar
BAKARI, G.G., MAX, R.A., MDEGELA, H.R., PHIRI, E.C.J. and MTAMBO, M.M.A. (2013) Efficacy of resinous extract from Commiphora swynnertonii (Burrt) against newcastle infection in chickens. International Journal of Medicinal Plants Research 2: 156-161.Google Scholar
BOKHARI, M.H. and AHMED, M.S.C.H. (1980) Food plants in Borno state, Nigeria, Gulani Publishers Lahore, India, pp. 31-32.Google Scholar
CHEN, Y., WANG, D., HU, Y., GUO, Z., WANG, J., ZHAO, X., FAN, Y., GUO, L., YANG, S., SAI, F. and XING, Y. (2010) Astragalus polysaccharide and oxymatrine can synergistically improve the immune efficacy of newcastle disease vaccine in chicken. International Journal of Biological Macromolecules 46: 425-428.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
CHOLLOM, S.C., OLAWUYI, A.K., DANJUMA, L.D., NANBOL, L.D., MAKINDE, I.O., HASHIMU, G.A., ALESA, M.U., ESILONU, J.T., OGUNDEJI, E.B. and KWATJEL, J.S. (2012a) Antiviral potential of aqueous extracts of some parts of Momordica balsamina plant against newcastle disease virus. Journal of Advanced Pharmacy Education & Research 2: 82-92.Google Scholar
CHOLLOM, S.C., AGADA, G.O.A., BOT, D.Y., OKOLO, M.O., DANTONG, D.D., CHOJI, T.P., ECHEONWU, B.C., BIGWAN, E.I., LOKASON, S. and BANWAT, E. (2012b) Phytochemical analysis and antiviral potential of aqueous leaf extract of Psidium guajava against newcastle disease virus in ovo. Journal of Applied Pharmaceutical Science 2: 045-049.Google Scholar
CHOLLOM, S.C., AGADA, G.O.A., GOTEP, J.G., MWANKON, S.E., DUS, P.C., BOT, Y.S., NYANGO, D.Y., SINGNAP, C.L., FYAKTU, E.J. and OKWORI, A.E.J. (2012c) Investigation of aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera lam seed for antiviral activity against newcastle disease virus in ovo. Journal of Medicinal Plants Research 6: 3870-3875.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
DONG, X.F., GAO, W.W., TONG, J.M., JIA, H.Q., SA, R.N. and ZHANG, Q. (2007) Effect of polysavone (alfalfa extract) on abdominal fat deposition and immunity in broiler chickens. Poultry Science 86: 1955-1959.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
DURRANI, F.R., CHAND, N., ZAKA, K., SULTAN, A., KHATTAK, F.M. and DURRANI, Z. (2007) Effect of different levels of feed added black seed (Nigella sativa L.) on the performance of broiler chicks. Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences 10: 4164-4167.Google ScholarPubMed
ELIZONDO-GONZALEZ, R., CRUZ-SUAREZ, L.E., RICQUE-MARIE, D., MENDOZA-GAMBOA, E., RODRIGUEZ-PADILLA, C. and TREJO-AVILA, L.M. (2012) In vitro characterisation of the antiviral activity of fucoidan from Cladosiphon okamuranus against newcastle disease virus. Virology Journal 9: 307.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
FARD, M.H.B., FEIZI, A. and BIJANZAD, P. (2010) Effect of Echinacea purpurea dried extract effect on producing antibody from newcastle disease vaccine in broilers by HI test. Journal of Veterinary Research 65: 119-122.Google Scholar
HUANG, Z., PANDA, A., ELANKUMARAN, S., GOVINDARAJAN, D., ROCKEMANN, D.D. and SAMAL, S.K. (2004) The haemaglutinin-neuraminidase protein of newcastle disease virus determines tropism and virulence. Journal of Virology 78: 4176-4184.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
IBRAHEEM, B.M.I., NEVEEN, A.R., MOHAMED, S.A.H. and KHALED, E.Y. (2012) Antimicrobial and antiviral activities against newcastle disease virus (NDV) from marine algae isolated from qusier and marsa-alam seashore (red sea), Egypt. African Journal of Biotechnology 11: 8332-8340.Google Scholar
IETIDAL, E.T.M., EL BUSHRA, E.S.E.N. and MAHASIN, E.N.A. (2010) The antibacterial, antiviral activities and phytochemical screening of some Sudanese medicinal plants. EurAsia Journal of Biosciences 4: 8-16.Google Scholar
JASSIM, S.A. and NAJI, M.A. (2003) Novel antiviral agents: a medicinal plant perspective. Journal of Applied Microbiology 95: 412-427.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
KHALIFA, K.A., ABEDLRAHIM, E.S., ELNASRI, I.M. and AHMED, S.O. (2013) A retrospective study (2000-2005) of poultry diseases diagnosed at department of avian diseases and diagnosis, veterinary research institute (VRI)-Khartoum. Sudanese Journal of Animal Science 9: 42-45.Google Scholar
KUMARI, R., TIWARY, B.K., PRASAD, A. and GANGULY, S. (2012) Aspragus racemous wild. root extract as herbal nutritional supplement for poultry. Global journal of Research on medicinal plants and indigenous medicine 1: 160-163.Google Scholar
LIU, Y. and GENQIANG, Y. (2009) Efficacy trials of crude extraction from Artemisia Annua L. against newcastle disease virus in vivo in Xinjiang. Modern Applied Science 3: 176-178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
MANISH, G., DIWANAY, S., GAIROLAC, S., SHINDE, Y., PATKI, P. and PATWARDHAN, B. (2004) Immunoadjuvant potential of Asparagus racemosus aqueous extract in experimental system. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 91: 251-255.Google Scholar
MAYO, M.A. (2002) A summary of taxonomic changes recently approved by ICTV. Archives of Virology 147: 1655-1663.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
MBANGA, J., MANGOMA, N. and SAIDI, B. (2010) An evaluation of the antimicrobial activities of Aloe barbadensis, A. chabaudii and A. arborescens leaf extracts used in folklore veterinary medicine in Zimbabwe. Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advancement 9: 2918-2923.Google Scholar
MTAMBO, M.M., MUSHI, E.J., KINABO, L.D., MAEDA-MACHANG'U, A., MWAMENGELE, G.L., YONGOLO, M.G. and TEMU, R.P. (1999) Evaluation of the efficacy of the crude extracts of Capsicum frutescens, Citrus limon and Opuntia vulgaris against newcastle disease in domestic fowl in Tanzania. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 68: 55-61.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
MUSHTAQ, M., DURRANI, F.R., IMTIAZ, N., SADIQUE, U., HAFEEZ, A., AKHTAR, S. and AHMAD, S. (2012) Effect of administration of Withania somnifera on some hematological and immunological profile of broiler chicks. Pakistan Veterinary Journal 32: 70-72.Google Scholar
ORSI, M.A., DORETTO, J.L., REISCHAK, D., DA SILVA, L.H., SPILKI, D.R., BUZINARO, M.G. and ARNS, C.W. (2009) Newcastle disease virus vaccine strains: immunogenicity is not influenced by ICPI. Brazilian Journal of Poultry Science 11: 129-133.Google Scholar
PARAMESWARI, G., MEENATCHISUNDARAM, S., SUBBRAJ, T., SUGANYA, T. and MICHAEL, A. (2009) Note on pharmacological activities of Melissa officinalis L. Ethnobotanical Leaflets 13: 211-212.Google Scholar
PEMANATHAN, M., KANDASAMY, K. and HIDEKI, N. (1999) Mangrove halophytes: A source of antiviral substances. South Pacific Study 19: 1-2.Google Scholar
PERERA, C. and EFFERTH, T. (2012) Antiviral medicinal herbs and phytochemicals. Journal Pharmacognosy 3: 45-48.Google Scholar
PIACENTI, A.M., KING, D.J., SEAL, B.S., ZHANG, J. and BROWN, C.C. (2006) Pathogenesis of newcastle disease in commercial and specific pathogen free turkeys experimentally infected with isolates of different virulence. Veterinary Pathology 43: 168-178.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
RAZIQ, F., KHAN, S., CHAND, N., SULTAN, A., MUSHTAQ, M., RAFIULLAH, , SUHAIL, S.M. and ZEB, A. (2012) Effect of water based infusion of Aloe barbedensis, Pimpinella anisum, Berberis lycium, Trigonella foenum-graecum and Allium sativum on the performance of broiler chicks. Pakistan Veterinary Journal 32: 593-596.Google Scholar
RAO, A.R., SUKUMAR, S., PARAMASIVAM, T.V., KAMALAKSHI, S., PARASHURAMAN, A.R. and SHANTHA, M. (1969) Study of antiviral activity of leaves of margosa tree (Melia azadericta) on vaccinia and variola viruses- a preliminary report. Indian Journal of Medical Research 57: 495-502.Google ScholarPubMed
SCHMUTTERER, H. (2002) The neem tree: source of unique natural products for integrated pest management, medicine, industry and other Purposes, 2nd Edition, Weinheim, Germany.Google Scholar
SENTHIL, N.S., KALAIVANI, K., CHUNG, P.G. and MURUGAN, K. (2006) Effect of neem limonoids on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) of the rice leaffolder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée) (Insecta: Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Chemosphere 62: 1388-1393.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
SENTHILNATHAN, P., PADMAVATHI, R., BANU, S.M. and SAKTHISEKARAN, D. (2006) Enhancement of antitumor effect of paclitaxel in combination with immunomodulatory Withania somnifera on benzo(a)pyrene induced experimental lung cancer. Chemico-Biological Interactions 159: 180-185.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
SHAM, D., CHITREB, D. and PATWARDHAN, B. (2003) Immuno- protection by botanical drugs in cancer chemotherapy. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 90: 49-55.Google Scholar
SUBAPRIYA, R. and NAGINI, S. (2005) Medicinal properties of neem leaves: a review. Current Medicinal Chememisty Anticancer Agents 5: 149-156.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
SULAIMAN, L.K., OLADELE, O.A., SHITTU, I.A., EMIKPE, B.O., OLADOKUN, A.T. and MESEKO, C.A. (2011) In-ovo evaluation of the antiviral activity of methanolic root-bark extract of the African baobab (Adansonia digitata Lin). African Journal of Biotechnology 10: 4256-4258.Google Scholar
WAFAA, A.H., HOWAIDA, I.A, HASSAN, A. and El-SAFTY, M.M. (2007) Chemical composition and 'in vitro' antiviral activity of Azadirachta indica A. Juss (neem) leaves and fruits against newcastle disease virus and infectious bursal disease virus. Australian Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences 1: 801-812.Google Scholar
WAIHENYA, R.K., MTAMBO, M.M. and NKWENGULILA, G. (2002) Evaluation of the efficacy of the crude extract of Aloe secundiflora in chickens experimentally infected with newcastle disease virus. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 79: 299-304.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
XIAO, C., BAO, G. and HU, S. (2009) Enhancement of immune responses to newcastle disease vaccine by a supplement of extract of Momordica cochinchinensis (lour.) spreng. seeds. Poultry Science 88: 2293-2297.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
YAN, Z., DU, Y., ZHAO, Q., FAN, R., GUO, W., MA, R., WANG, X. and ZHU, R. (2011) Mucosal immune responses against live newcastle disease vaccine in immunosuppressed chickens. Pakistan Veterinary Journal 31: 280-286.Google Scholar
ZIAUDDIN, M., PHANSALKAR, N., PATKI, P., DIWANAY, S. and PATWARDHAN, B. (1996) Studies on the immunomodulatory effects of ashwagandha. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 50: 69-76.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Antiviral and immune boosting activities of different medicinal plants against Newcastle disease virus in poultry
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Antiviral and immune boosting activities of different medicinal plants against Newcastle disease virus in poultry
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Antiviral and immune boosting activities of different medicinal plants against Newcastle disease virus in poultry
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *