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Temperature, Adjuvants, and UV Light Affect Sethoxydim Phytotoxicity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Robert Matysiak
Affiliation:
North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58105
John D. Nalewaja*
Affiliation:
North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58105
*
Corresponding author's E-mail: nalewaja@plains.nodak.edu.

Abstract

Experiments were conducted using oat in the greenhouse to determine phytotoxicity and spray deposit characteristics of sethoxydim on oat as influenced by adjuvants, ultraviolet (UV) light, and temperature at and shortly after application. Petroleum oil of low viscosity was equal or more effective with sethoxydim when applied at 10 than at 25 C, but high-viscosity petroleum oil was more effective at 25 than at 10 C. UV light reduced sethoxydim efficacy more for high- than low-viscosity petroleum oil adjuvant at 25 C, but not at 10 C. Commercial vegetable oil adjuvant was less effective with sethoxydim at 10 than at 25 C, and UV light reduced efficacy at both temperatures. Commercial methylated vegetable oil was the most effective adjuvant and efficacy was only slightly reduced by UV light at 25 C. A secondary alcohol surfactant that is considered hydrophilic enhanced sethoxydim efficacy even when exposed to UV light. Adjuvants that gave discernible uniform spray deposits with close contact to the epicuticular surface, including over anticlinal walls, resulted in the most effective treatments. The results indicated that temperature at application is important to adjuvant efficacy, partly because of the effect on spray deposit characteristics.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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