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Short-Term Split Application Effects of Grass-Specific Herbicides on Quackgrass (Elytrigia repens) Under Field Conditions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

K. Neil Harker
Affiliation:
Agric. and Agri-Food Canada, Lacombe Research Centre, 6000 C&E Trail, Lacombe, Alberta, Canada T4L 1W1

Abstract

Field experiments were conducted at the Lacombe Research Station from 1989 to 1991 to determine if short-term, split applications of grass-specific herbicides would improve quackgrass control relative to single applications. Quackgrass infested plots were planted to canola the first year and barley the following year. Glyphosate applied at 880 g/ha controlled quackgrass to a greater extent and for a longer time period than any of the grass-specific herbicides. In contrast to glyphosate, none of the grass-specific herbicides controlled quackgrass 1 yr after treatment. Quackgrass control with sethoxydim or fluazifop-P was usually similar when applied as single or short-term, split applications. In contrast, quizalofop often provided better quackgrass control and higher crop yields when short-term, split applications were compared to a single application with the same total amount of quizalofop. However, the extent of increased quackgrass control is difficult to justify due to increased application costs and inconvenience.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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Short-Term Split Application Effects of Grass-Specific Herbicides on Quackgrass (Elytrigia repens) Under Field Conditions
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