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Remote Sensing of Broom Snakeweed (Gutierrezia Sarothrae) with Noaa-10 Spectral Image Processing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Albert J. Peters
Affiliation:
Dep. Geogr., New Mexico St. Univ., Las Cruces, NM 88003
Bradley C. Reed
Affiliation:
Dep. Geogr., New Mexico St. Univ., Las Cruces, NM 88003
Marlen D. Eve
Affiliation:
Dep. Geogr., New Mexico St. Univ., Las Cruces, NM 88003
Kirk C. McDaniel
Affiliation:
Dep. An. and Range Sci., New Mexico St. Univ., Las Cruces, NM 88003

Abstract

Low-spatial resolution satellite imagery from the NOAA-10 polar-orbiting meteorological satellite was analyzed to determine if central New Mexico grasslands infested by broom snakeweed could be discriminated from unaffected areas. Distinctive phenological characteristics of broom snakeweed, including an early season growth flush and late season flowering, enable moderate to heavily infested areas to be separated from grasslands having few or no weeds present. The procedure used shows promise as a tool for locating and monitoring brown snakeweed and other weeds growing on shortgrass prairie.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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References

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Remote Sensing of Broom Snakeweed (Gutierrezia Sarothrae) with Noaa-10 Spectral Image Processing
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