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Mesotrione and Glufosinate in Glufosinate-Resistant Corn

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Gregory R. Armel
Affiliation:
Eastern Shore Agriculture Research and Extension Center, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Painter, VA 23420
Robert J. Richardson
Affiliation:
Eastern Shore Agriculture Research and Extension Center, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Painter, VA 23420
Henry P. Wilson
Affiliation:
Eastern Shore Agriculture Research and Extension Center, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Painter, VA 23420
Thomas E. Hines
Affiliation:
Eastern Shore Agriculture Research and Extension Center, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Painter, VA 23420
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Field experiments were conducted in 1999 and 2000 to evaluate early POST (EPOST) and late POST (LPOST) control of common ragweed and giant foxtail with mesotrione at 70, 105, and 140 g ai/ha alone and in mixtures with glufosinate at 300 g ai/ha in glufosinate-resistant corn. Glufosinate-resistant corn injury was frequently higher with mixtures of mesotrione plus glufosinate than with mesotrione applied alone. Mixtures of mesotrione with glufosinate applied EPOST injured corn 6 to 21% in 1999, but in 2000, injury from mixtures was 23 to 30% from LPOST applications. Common ragweed control was above 77% with all treatments, which included 105 g/ha mesotrione. Giant foxtail control was higher at 76 to 78% by mixtures of mesotrione with glufosinate applied LPOST than by mesotrione alone. Corn yields were highest when glufosinate was included in treatments at either application timing. In the greenhouse, mixtures of mesotrione with glufosinate-injured glufosinate-resistant corn 11% or less, but corn biomass was reduced by 25% for the mixture of mesotrione at 105 g/ha plus glufosinate at 350 g/ha. Mixtures of mesotrione with glufosinate can be more effective than mesotrione alone but control of common ragweed and giant foxtail might not be commercially acceptable.

Type
Weed Management—Major Crops
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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