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Interactions of Fenoxaprop-ethyl with Bensulfuron and Bentazon in Dry-Seeded Rice (Oryza sativa)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

David L. Jordan
Affiliation:
Northeast Res. Stn., Louisiana State Univ. Agric. Center, P.O. Box 438, St. Joseph, LA 71366

Abstract

Field experiments were conducted in 1993 and 1994 to evaluate barnyardgrass control with fenoxaprop-ethyl applied alone or in a mixture with bentazon or bensulfuron. Bensulfuron at 52 g ai/ha did not reduce barnyardgrass control with fenoxaprop-ethyl applied at rates of 56, 75, or 94 g ai/ha. In contrast, mixing bentazon at 1.1 kg ae/ha with fenoxaprop-ethyl reduced barnyardgrass control and rice yield compared with fenoxaprop-ethyl applied alone or mixed with bensulfuron.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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Interactions of Fenoxaprop-ethyl with Bensulfuron and Bentazon in Dry-Seeded Rice (Oryza sativa)
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Interactions of Fenoxaprop-ethyl with Bensulfuron and Bentazon in Dry-Seeded Rice (Oryza sativa)
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Interactions of Fenoxaprop-ethyl with Bensulfuron and Bentazon in Dry-Seeded Rice (Oryza sativa)
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