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Integrating Mechanical and Chemical Weed Management in Corn (Zea mays)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Jane Mt. Pleasant
Affiliation:
Dep. Soil. Crop Atmos. Sci., Cornell Univ., Ithaca NY 14853
Robert F. Burt
Affiliation:
Dep. Soil. Crop Atmos. Sci., Cornell Univ., Ithaca NY 14853
James C. Frisch
Affiliation:
Dep. Soil. Crop Atmos. Sci., Cornell Univ., Ithaca NY 14853

Abstract

Experiments conducted over three years compared weed cover and grain yields in corn which received cultivation alone, herbicide alone, and treatments combining mechanical and chemical weed control. Weed cover averaged 30% with cultivation alone compared to 9% for the other treatments. Grain yields were 7% lower in one year. In the cultivation-alone treatments the rolling cultivator was less effective in controlling weeds than the shovel/sweep cultivator. In-row weed cover was greater than between-row weed cover with cultivation alone. With banded herbicide plus cultivation, in and between-row weed cover was the same. Weed cover and grain yields following banded herbicide plus cultivation were equivalent to broadcast herbicide with or without cultivation.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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References

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